Trending February 2024 # A Closer Look At The Axon Phone’s “Hi # Suggested March 2024 # Top 2 Popular

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32-bit playback, really?

“Customers told us what was missing from today’s smartphones, and low-quality audio was one of the biggest sticking points.” – ZTE

When we talk about audio bit-depth, from a consumer perspective, we mean the number of points available with which to record or playback the waveform’s amplitude. 16-bit CD quality audio offers 65,535 points (-32,768 through 32,767), 24-bit studio quality files offer 16,777,216 possible values (−8,388,608 to 8,388,607) and 32-bit files reach a huge 4,294,967,296 range.

People often confuse bit-depth with the resolution “accuracy” of something like a camera image or incorrectly think about smoothing out signal “stair-stepping”. But the real purpose of higher bit-depth at the recording and playback stage is to improve the signal to noise ratio (SNR). 32-bit math processing is a different matter. This is done by increasing the number of points between the peak signal and the noise floor (dynamic range) and reducing distortion caused by rounding errors, something which dithering also addresses.

On paper, an ideal 16-bit signal has an SNR of 96dB, 24-bit has 144dB, while 32-bit theoretically jumps to 192dB.

Noise pre ADC or post DAC reduces the useful bit-depth of digital audio.

However, there are physical limitations to the actual SNR that can be achieved, which depends on hardware layout and the noise limits of integrated circuits. Real world high-end audio implementations are often limited to an SNR less than 132dB, which works out to 22-bits.

Jargon Buster:

Data from the Axon phone press release vs other flagships ( source ).

The Axon’s result is still very good for a smartphone and shows a noticeable improvement over competing handsets on the market. However, it doesn’t provide as big of a gap between the competition as the 32-bit tag line would suggest, and won’t lend itself to the full dynamic range offered by a 24-bit source, let alone a 32-bit file.

All of that said, by the time we take the average listening environment, volume, and increased amounts of compression used in modern music, listeners will struggle to notice any difference between 16, 24 and 32-bit audio anyway.

Distortion Characteristics Recording options

Turning to the handset’s recording options, the Axon boasts a 24-bit ADC with dual-microphone for omni-directional recordings, using a microphone at the top and bottom of the device.

The two microphones can help more accurately pinpoint a sound within 20 meters from the phone. As for how it works, just imagine a sound traveling to your ears. The slight difference in space between the two means that a sound arrives at ever so slightly different times, which allows your brain to pinpoint the rough location. A single (or mono) microphone setup does not capture this time difference, but a stereo microphone setup can help preserve this additional sense of space.

The phase and time differences between offset microphones helps to preserve a more realistic sense of distance. ( source

While this effect will probably work reasonably well when listening back through headphones, the decision to use a single speaker in the Axon phone means that this effect may not preserve quite the same sense of space when mixed down to a mono signal.

The ADC boasts 24-bit 96 kHz sound capture, but a quick check of the spec sheet SNR again suggests that the real-world usable bit-depth is actually closer to 17-bit, or 16-bit when the mic amp adds an additional 18dB of gain.

This is still more than good enough for high-quality, low noise audio capture, providing that the microphone is good enough, and the ability to capture stereo audio data through the use of two microphones should offer up a compelling sense of space. This could be a particularly nice feature to use in conjunction with the phone’s video capture.

Extra Features

ZTE has also picked an audio codec that comes with a built-in DSP core. The AK4961 can handle echo cancellation and microphone noise suppression for audio recording on the chip. It can also perform voice processing to enable voice commands and wake-up functions, as well as hands free functionality. Having these processes managed on the codec will save on the need for additional hardware or using up main CPU processing time.

Like all good codecs, the AK4961 and 4490 feature oversampling modes to reduce noise from out-of-band sources and make use of differential inputs and outputs to help prevent noise leaking into the signal path from additional sources.

Wrap Up

Hopefully this breakdown has helped to give you an idea of the type of audio improvements that the Axon phone actually delivers and those that it can’t.

While a 32-bit “Hi-Fi Audio” DAC tag-line might be an easy sell, the reality is that the confined and noisy environments of a smartphone chassis are not going to allow hardware to operate anywhere close to that level of accuracy, if consumers could even notice the difference. However, the Axon phone’s choice of high quality ADC and DAC hardware does boast improvements to noise and distortion, which are sure to please audiophiles out there.

We’ll have some more time to spend listening to the phone when review time rolls around, so we won’t draw any final conclusions. But the Axon looks to be a step in the right direction for mobile audio lovers.

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Get A Closer Look At Your Network Speed With Nperf Speed Test

Functionality

nPerf Speed Test tests not one, but three different metrics. It’ll test your Internet speed including upload, download, and ping. It can also test your browsing performance by opening a slew of websites and seeing how long each one takes. It’ll conclude the test with a YouTube streaming test that streams video at 260p, 360p, and 720p to see how long it takes to load, how much data is used, and buffer time if there is any. This far more testing than your traditional speed test and it makes nPerf feel like a real all-in-one kind of test.

Once the app has completed its workout, you’ll see the total results of the test along with an aggregate score. Your score can be compared to other ISPs and shared with others if you wish. The app is able to discern what kind of connection you have (3G, 4G, WiFi). On the History page in the app, you can also see and keep track of where you did you speed tests on a map so you can compare speeds based on your location.

In the Settings, you can tweak your experience to a degree. You can set things like your network type, bitrate units, default test, language, background style, and whether or not to record your GPS location. There is also an option to set a warning to let you know you’re about to reach your data plan limits (if you have limits). The developers also claim to use less than half of the data for their tests that other test apps use.

Design

nPerf’s UI is fairly straightforward. The interface is simple to understand with Holo-style hamburger menus so navigation is simple and reasonably predictable. It is very simple to use. You select your test type and hit the go button. Then you sit around and wait.

The design itself is colorful and enjoyable. The buttons are large and easy to see and nPerf manages to look good without overdoing it. Animations were fluid in our testing although we’re sure you’ll see some stutter on older devices.

The Good

Here’s what we liked about nPerf Speed Test:

Doesn’t just measure speed like most competitors. It also measures streaming performance and website loading performance as well. The app also measures averages along with maximums for more metrics than most competitors.

It’s very simple to use. You can run a full test as soon as you open the app or choose an individual test in the hamburger menu by tapping in the top left corner.

The ability to map where you do your speed tests, review testing history, and compare to other ISPs and phone services are pleasant extra features for those who are seriously into network testing.

The design is very clean.

Contributing your speed test data to nPerf also helps them compile information like this from France where they can put together graphs and charts about what carriers do the best.

According to nPerf developers, their official website will soon host coverage maps and network data performance.

nPerf uses dedicated and optimized servers for a more accurate speed test.

The Bad

Here’s what we didn’t like so much:

nPerf has a function to warn you when you’re about to reach your data plan limits. For instance, if you have a 1GB plan, you can have it warn you when you’ve used 800MB. Android has this functionality built right into the OS so we didn’t see a real need for this feature. It’s not bad, just redundant.

Like most benchmarks, you probably won’t be using an app like this every day.

Final Thoughts

The Latest Foldable Phones – A Look At The Huawei Mate X2

The Base Specs

The Huawei Mate X measures 161.8 x 145.8 x 8.2 mm when unfolded and 161.8 x 74.6 x 14.7 mm when folded. It is powered by the Kirin 9000 CPU and a 4500mAh battery.

The two halves of the phone are actually not symmetrical in terms of thickness, with both sides being slightly wedge-shaped. This design technically allows there to be no gap between the two halves when folded. But makes the phone lopsided in terms of weight balance and means it doesn’t sit well on flat surfaces. While it’s an exciting solution to the gap that Samsung still leaves between the two closed halves a generation later, Oppo and Honor have since pioneered more elegant solutions.

Models/Versions

At the time of its release, Huawei had two lines of foldable phones, though a third line has since been released. The Mate X series has a large central screen. The second-generation version we’re covering here has a foldable screen on the inside of the fold similar to other manufacturers. The Mate Xs series has a slightly smaller screen size and has the foldable screen located on the outside of the fold. The Pocket series also has a clamshell-style vertical fold and a much smaller form factor, similar to the Samsung Galaxy Flip series.

The Huawei Mate X2 is available in three capacities: a 256GB variant with 8GB of RAM, a 512GB variant with 8GB of RAM, and a 512GB variant with 12GB of RAM. All capacities support expandable storage with Huawei’s proprietary NanoMemory expansion cards up to 256GB in capacity, though this uses the second shared SIM slot.

Battery

The Huawei Mate X2 has a reasonably sized battery with a capacity of 450mAh. It can fast-charge at 55W with the included proprietary SuperCharge charger, though that can output a maximum of 66W. While it does support standard USB PowerDelivery charging, it only does so at significantly slower, non-fast-charge speeds. There is no support for wireless or reverse charging.

Many foldable phones have high-end hardware but only average battery capacities. This results in lower battery lives than you might see in flagship phones which already struggle to survive a full day of reasonably heavy use. With the slightly lower power draw, and performance of the Kirin CPU compared to the latest Snapdragon CPUs, the battery life is a bit better than you might expect. The large screen, however, has a big impact on battery life. If you need to make the most of a single charge, it’s best to limit use to just the cover screen.

Screen

The Huawei Mate X2 has a 8.0-inch foldable main screen with a resolution of 2200 x 2480 for a pixel density of 413 PPI. It has a 90Hz refresh rate, and a peak brightness of 542 nits. The secondary cover display is 6.45-inches across and has a resolution of 1160 x 2700 for a pixel density of 452 PPI. Again, its refresh rate is limited to just 90Hz. Neither screen officially support HDR10+ and support is spotty, in practice, however, some sources may be able to play HDR content, so your mileage may vary.

Cameras

The Huawei Mate X2 has a quad rear camera setup. A primary wide-angle camera has a 50MP 1/1.28-inch sensor with an f/1.9 lens. The telephoto camera has a 12MP sensor, an f/2.4 lens, and 3x optical zoom. There’s also a periscope telephoto camera with an 8MP sensor, an f/4.4 lens, and a 10x optical zoom. The final camera is an ultrawide with a 16MP sensor and an f/2.2 lens. The cover screen has a hole-punch selfie camera with a 16MP sensor and an f/2.2 lens.

The rear cameras are a strong point of the Mate X2. The pair of telephoto cameras work well together to provide excellent optical zoom capabilities. The 10x optical zoom can even be combined with digital zoom for up to 100x zoom. Obviously, this comes with some reduction in quality, but not as much as you’d see on other phones lacking a 10x optical zoom.

The ultrawide also features autofocus and so can pull double duty as a macro camera. Low light performance isn’t great, but is acceptable, with long exposure and processing times in night mode to get decent pictures. The selfie camera is perfectly normal and acceptable, but likely rarely used. It does have an unusually large, elongated hole punch. The main screen does not have any form of selfie camera. Video-wise, the rear cameras can record in 4K or 1080p both 30 and 60fps. The selfie camera can only record at 1080p30.

Software/OS

The Huawei Mate X2 was released with Android 10 and the EMUI 11 skin. An update to HarmonyOS is available. Being a China regional exclusive and more importantly a Huawei device. The Mate X2 also doesn’t support Google Play services which may be a big issue for potential western buyers looking to import one.

Features

The single most prominent feature of the Huawei Mate X2 is, of course, the ability to flip the phone open and closed. The hinge design is decent allowing the screens to be flush against each other, though this comes at the cost of the uneven wedge-shaped halves. The crease is present and noticeable, but less so than on Samsung’s foldable devices.

The joint of the phone, unlike most foldable phones, is easy to move, only holding position reliably in the fully open or fully closed positions. It can’t easily be partially folded and just left to rest there as the hinge isn’t stiff.

There is a fingerprint reader, however, unlike most modern high-end phones, it isn’t embedded under the screen. Instead, it’s a classic side power button/fingerprint reader combo. This makes some sense as the single sensor can be used to unlock the phone when it’s closed, open, or somewhere in between. The phone can also be unlocked with facial recognition.

Dual SIM cards are supported, though the second slot also doubles as the NanoMemory expandable storage slot. Wi-Fi 6 is supported for high-speed home networking, and 5G is supported for the fastest mobile data speeds.

Price

The 256GB model has a retail price of ¥ 17999, which is roughly $2650. The 512GB model with 12GB of RAM, sells for ¥18999, approximately $2798. The phone has an extremely short supply, mainly a tech demo with a sky-high price. Being a China-exclusive and with limited numbers, you’ll struggle to find it outside the region. However, some international resellers may occasionally have models.

Be careful where you buy from, with the limited numbers and high price, it may well be a popular target for unscrupulous sellers and web stores. We highly recommend you use a payment service that will reliably respond to refund requests or chargebacks to help you get your money back in the case of fraud.

Improvements Over Previous Generations

The previous generation of the Mate X has the foldable screen bend around the outside of the fold. The change to an interior folding screen with a secondary cover screen brings them more in line with the rest of the industry and helps to protect the screen. The CPU, obviously, has been upgraded from the previous generation. The screens now run at 90Hz, rather than 60. The cameras are better in all regards, though a ToF sensor is missing. The Mate X2 also has stereo audio.

Summary

The Huawei Mate X2 is a solid foldable phone. Unlike many foldable phones, it features an excellent camera set. Performance is generally reasonable across the board, though it’s not quite top tier. The lack of any waterproofing rating and the limit of just 90Hz on the displays may put some potential users off.

Concerns about the lifespan of the fold in the screen are likely to be difficult to assuage. The price, however, is likely to be the main issue. At over $2500, the Mate X2 is extremely expensive, assuming you can even find one in stock. Flagship phones with significantly better performance and features are available for more than $1000 less. The real question is do you really want, or need, a phone that folds? If that’s the case, you’ll have to accept some compromises, and, in this case, a sky-high price tag.

How To Handle A Hi

So you have a shiny new HiDPI screen, and you want to use it with Linux. The bad news is there isn’t a one-size-fits-all solution. Each desktop environment handles scaling differently. The good news is there is a way to handle HiDPI displays on each of the major Linux desktop environments.

Unity

Unity handles HiDPI displays fairly well, and it’s easy to implement. Open up the Unity “Settings.” It’s one of the default favorite applications. If you changed it, you’ll be able to search for it easily enough.

Towards the bottom of the window is a slider that allows you to scale the interface. By scaling it above “1,” you can increase the size of the display to a point where it fits your display. When you’re happy with your settings, save it.

KDE

KDE also handles HiDPI screens well out of the box. Open up KDE’s “Settings.” Like Unity, it should be one of your default favorites. If you changed your favorites, you can still find it under “All Applications” followed by “Settings.” The application that you’re looking for is “System Settings.”

Find “Monitor and Display”. This is the window where you can change your monitor’s resolution and refresh rate. If you’re not running the proprietary NVIDIA drivers, and you haven’t already done so, change these settings to match your monitor.

After you have everything the way you want, log out and log back in. Depending on your system, it might require a full system reboot to take effect.

GNOME

The best way to handle setting GNOME up for HiDPI screens is to use GNOME Tweak Tool. If you’re on Ubuntu, it’s already installed. Other distributions have it readily available in their repositories.

Note: Gnome only allows you to set an integer value for the scaling factor. This means that you won’t be able to scale up/down proportionately.

Known Issues

GNOME is known to have some scaling issues with the above method. There isn’t any other solution built directly into the GNOME desktop at this time. If you are experiencing poor scaling because of the lack of more fine-grained support, check out the window manager section of this article.

GNOME users who have tried the methods detailed in the window manager section have experienced better results than using GNOME directly. This is because those solutions interact directly with the underlying X server instead of the more complicated GNOME shell. Since GNOME receives its information from X, it will still ultimately affect GNOME.

You might also want to consider saving the options that you arrive at in either the “.xinitrc” file or “/etc/X11/xorg.conf.”  This will make them permanent. Chances are you’re running a full-featured desktop for convenience, and you don’t necessarily like having to manually configure everything, especially not at each boot.

XFCE

XFCE is easily the worst when it comes to HiDPI support. If you use XFCE, consider changing environments, seriously.

For everything else in XFCE, you might want to consider following the same steps as the window managers.

Window Managers

Window managers like i3 can be tricky. They don’t have fancy graphical configurations that you can use to set the display resolution or to scale the display. For that you’re going to have to work directly with the X server.

The first thing that you need to do is set the DPI of the fonts. You can do this through the “.Xresources” file. Add the following block to tell programs that load from “.Xresources” how to handle fonts.

Xft.dpi:

180

Xft.autohint:

0

Xft.lcdfilter: lcddefault Xft.hintstyle: hintfull Xft.hinting:

1

Xft.antialias:

1

Xft.rgba: rgb

Obviously, set the DPI to match your monitor.

Now, the best way to set the DPI for the X server is xrandr. Just run the command with the --dpi flag followed by the DPI of your screen.

xrandr

--dpi

180

If you don’t want to run that command every time you boot up your computer, you can add it into your window manager’s configuration to run at startup or even the “.xinitrc” file. Running it in front of i3 in “.xinitrc” would look like the example below.

[

[

-f

~

/

.Xresources

]

]

&&

xrdb

-merge

~

/

.Xresources

&

xrandr

--dpi

180

exec

i3

Adding the line to i3’s configuration file would look like this:

exec

xrandr

--dpi

180

Either way should work. If it still doesn’t, you may need to specify your monitor’s resolution and dimensions in “/etc/X11/xorg.conf” so the X server can accurately determine how to scale everything.

Closing Thoughts

None of these solutions are universal. Different applications calculate DPI differently and get their information from different sources. You may have to address applications individually. If you’re having issues with a number of programs, consider following the steps outlined for window managers. Since they directly impact the X server and a lot of programs get their information from the X server, changing those settings might solve a number of problems at once.

Nick Congleton

Nick is a freelance tech. journalist, Linux enthusiast, and a long time PC gamer.

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Edtech Is At Peak: A Look Back At Major Education Improvements In 2023

2024 has seen unprecedented growth in Edtech sector with more tech companies coming up with emerging ideas.

For the first time, 

Big changes for Moodle mobile app

April unofficially marked the beginning of the crisis. Lockdowns were implemented in many countries across the globe making tech solution providers find a substitute for physical classes. At that time, Moodle App announced the launch of Moodle App Pro and Moodle App Premium for organizations to be able to access more powerful features for mobile learning. While the app remains free for learners and individuals, organizations can choose the mobile learning plan that best suits their need. The new Moodle app plans were focused on medium and large organizations that use mobile learning extensively. Some of the features of the update are expanded notifications with multimedia previews, more offline courses per device and more custom branding options.  

EduBrisk starts classroom to the virtual classroom program

EduBrisk, the emerging brain-friendly educational solution announced that the company will provide a revolutionary education program ‘Classroom to Virtual Classroom within the next 24 hours’ in May 2023. This leverages the facility to enable schools and freelance teachers to go live within 24 hours. The company began the initiative by taking 30 schools on-board in the mission. The schools will totally go live through the virtual program.  

Google announces new tools to boost learning

In August, Google kick-started it’s ‘Anywhere school 2023 event.’ The initiative powers the remote learning process. The company has introduced over 50 classrooms and Meet features. With the latest move, Google Meet users will be able to see all the 49 participants on the screen at the same time. Google also announced that the company will incorporate its digital whiteboard called Jamboard in Google Meet in September. Besides, Google Meet will also get the ability to replace or blur the background in Meet.  

Apple updates coding program and resources for educators and students

Apple announced the launch of a new set of tools to help educators teach coding to students from grade school to college. Besides significant enhancements to the Development in Swift and Everyone Can Code Curricula, Apple has also started a new professional learning course for Develop in Swift, available at no cost. In addition, Apple is adding resources for educators and parents to help ensure they have the tools they need to help students learn and grow from anywhere.  

Suraasa is upskilling Indian teachers, offering global opportunities

Quality education is one of the top priorities for every government today. To make education accessible and impactful, teachers have to be highly qualified for the job. Suraasa trains teachers in the UK, India and UAE to make them work with both public and private schools. The start-up builds its own courses, working with people who have master’s degrees and chúng tôi in education and have had decades of experience in international teaching and learning.  

PlayShifu launches Orboot Dino, an AR globe for dinosaur lovers

For the first time, EdTech is receiving exponential attention and funding. Thanks to the Covid-19 pandemic. The education sector is under rough weather since the outbreak of the contagious disease. Schools, colleges and all other education venues stopped physical classes. However, the virus can’t stop the educators from teaching their students. The year 2023 has seen unprecedented growth in Edtech sector with more tech giants coming in with emerging ideas and start-ups finally getting the attention they deserve. The global Edtech market is a diverse and rapidly growing industry with a large runaway across the business lifecycle from early-stage start-ups to middle-market companies and publicly traded companies. Education industry faced its biggest crisis in 2023. As the traditional education systems closed its door for students and teachers, pencil and notebook way of learning got lost in the school corridor. Whatever educators, students and their families planned for 2023 back in January, became irrelevant in March when WHO declared Covid-19 as a global pandemic. This brought light to the emerging trend, remote learning . Both tech companies and investors saw high potential in the sector and made their moves at the right time. Recently, around 88% of growth has been witnessed in the number of individuals downloading Edtech apps. Even though 2023 was not an easy year, 2023 is expected to be more or less similar . But more developments are expected in the upcoming months. Henceforth, let us go back in time and have a look at big tech decisions and trends that stole the Edtech stage in 2023.April unofficially marked the beginning of the crisis. Lockdowns were implemented in many countries across the globe making tech solution providers find a substitute for physical classes. At that time, Moodle App announced the launch of Moodle App Pro and Moodle App Premium for organizations to be able to access more powerful features for mobile learning. While the app remains free for learners and individuals, organizations can choose the mobile learning plan that best suits their need. The new Moodle app plans were focused on medium and large organizations that use mobile learning extensively. Some of the features of the update are expanded notifications with multimedia previews, more offline courses per device and more custom branding options.EduBrisk, the emerging brain-friendly educational solution announced that the company will provide a revolutionary education program ‘Classroom to Virtual Classroom within the next 24 hours’ in May 2023. This leverages the facility to enable schools and freelance teachers to go live within 24 hours. The company began the initiative by taking 30 schools on-board in the mission. The schools will totally go live through the virtual chúng tôi August, Google kick-started it’s ‘Anywhere school 2023 event.’ The initiative powers the remote learning process. The company has introduced over 50 classrooms and Meet features. With the latest move, Google Meet users will be able to see all the 49 participants on the screen at the same time. Google also announced that the company will incorporate its digital whiteboard called Jamboard in Google Meet in September. Besides, Google Meet will also get the ability to replace or blur the background in Meet.Apple announced the launch of a new set of tools to help educators teach coding to students from grade school to college. Besides significant enhancements to the Development in Swift and Everyone Can Code Curricula, Apple has also started a new professional learning course for Develop in Swift, available at no cost. In addition, Apple is adding resources for educators and parents to help ensure they have the tools they need to help students learn and grow from anywhere.Quality education is one of the top priorities for every government today. To make education accessible and impactful, teachers have to be highly qualified for the job. Suraasa trains teachers in the UK, India and UAE to make them work with both public and private schools. The start-up builds its own courses, working with people who have master’s degrees and chúng tôi in education and have had decades of experience in international teaching and learning.Playshifu, an educational toymaker announced the launch of Orboot Dino at CES 2023 that took place in September. This toy, when used with the compatible app using AR, superimposes animals from the prehistoric worlds. The dinosaurs come alive in 3D on scanning the globe with the app. Orboot Dino is compatible with a range of tablets and smartphones and is available on Android and iOS stores.

Turn Your Raspberry Pi Into A Hi

RuneAudio describes itself as “free and open-source software that turns embedded hardware into Hi-Fi music players.” By installing RuneAudio on a Raspberry Pi, you transform it into a Hi-Fi media center capable of playing music from multiple sources.

You can control Rune from any device. It sets up its own web server that lets you access its user interface over your local network. You can open up a browser or connect with a free app and control your Hi-Fi system.

What You’ll Need

There are a couple of things that you’re going to need to get set up. Nothing here is too out of the ordinary.

Raspberry Pi (1, 2, or 3)

SD Card or MicroSD (depending on your Pi)

Power Supply for the Pi

A way to connect your Pi to your network

SD card reader

Computer (any OS will work)

Speakers

DAC (optional)

External Hard Drive/Music Source

Download Rune

When you have everything ready, you can head over to the RuneAudio website and download the right version of the software for your Raspberry Pi.

Flash Your SD Card

To use RuneAudio you need to flash the image file that you just downloaded onto your SD card. Connect the SD card reader to your computer (if you have to) and insert your card. Make sure that there’s nothing you want to save on there because it will be erased completely.

The next part depends on the operating system that you’re using.

Windows

Windows doesn’t have any great disk-flashing utilities built in, so you have to download one. If you have a preference, use that. Otherwise, you can pick up Win32DiskWriter. It’s free and simple to use.

Linux

sudo

dd

if

=

"RuneAudio_rpi_0.3-beta_20141029_2GB.img"

of

=

"/dev/mmcblk0"

bs

=8M

The “if” should be set to the location of the image file. The “of” is the location of the SD card. Make sure that you get the “of” value right. It will erase whichever drive it’s pointed at.

Set Up Your Hardware

Now you can put all of the pieces together. Remove the SD card from the computer and put it in the Raspberry Pi. Connect the Pi to your router. Rune doesn’t require a monitor, keyboard, or mouse for the Pi. You should connect up your speakers, DAC, and your external hard drive (if you have one) now. You can control everything over your network. With the card inserted and the Pi connected, plug it in.

The RuneAudio software will autonomously set itself up. You don’t have to do anything. Just wait for Rune to set itself up. It’s going to take several minutes, so wait for around fifteen minutes to be sure that it’s done setting up before you do anything.

If not, entering the IP address of the Raspberry Pi will. You can check that on your router, or you can use any number of network search tools. When you have it, enter it in your browser. RuneUI will display.

Jump on RuneUI

RuneUI is the default interface for controlling RuneAudio. It has all of the controls that you need to manage your music playback and library.

The networked drive setup requires that you enter the connection information for your music storage drive. Make sure that you select the right type of network share and the exact directory. Rune will save all files in the path to your library, even if they aren’t music.

If you plan on using your phone as a controller, you should look into the MPD settings under the menu. Rune uses the MPD settings to connect to apps on your phone like MPDroid.

Feel free to explore any of the other settings under the RuneUI menu, but none of them are going to stand in your way of playing music.

Playing music is very simple through RuneUI. The interface is very simple and features the album art of the song that’s currently playing. RuneAudio fetches it automatically.

There are plenty of things that you can do with Rune. If you connect it to a DAC and a great sound system, you will notice the quality. Plus, the interface and the connectivity that RuneAudio provides make it an extremely convenient solution.

Nick Congleton

Nick is a freelance tech. journalist, Linux enthusiast, and a long time PC gamer.

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Our latest tutorials delivered straight to your inbox

Sign up for all newsletters.

By signing up, you agree to our Privacy Policy and European users agree to the data transfer policy. We will not share your data and you can unsubscribe at any time.

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