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Introduction to Toolbar in Excel

The Toolbar is an area where you can add different commands or tools associated with Excel. By default, it is located above the ribbon with different tools and in the Excel window’s upper right corner. To increase customer friendliness, toolbars have become customizable according to the frequent use of different tools. Instead of a set of tools, excel gives us the option to select and build a Quick Access Toolbar. This makes quick access to the tools that you want. So the toolbar is popularly known as Quick Access Toolbar.

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Save: To save the created workbook.

Undo: To return or step back one level of an immediate action performed.

Redo: Repeat the last action.

How to Use the Toolbar in Excel?

The Toolbar in Excel is a shortcut tool to avoid searching for the commands you often use in the worksheet. Using Toolbar in Excel is easy, and it helps us simplify access to the document’s commands. Let’s understand the working of the Toolbar in Excel by the examples below.

Example #1

Adding Commands to the Toolbar in Excel

To get more tools, you have the option to customize the Quick Access Toolbar simply by adding the commands.

A new command is selected, which will be added to the toolbar highlighted as the command is added with already available tools.

Example #2

Adding Commands to the Toolbar in Excel

There are options to add more tools Instead of the listed commands. Select More Commands to add more commands to the quick Access Toolbar.

You will get a new window that gives you all the options available with Excel to add to your toolbar.

You can select which tools to add from the Choose commands in the drop-down. Each list will lead to a different list of commands that you can add to the toolbar.

Once you add the command, it will appear in the list next to the add button. This is the list of tools added to the Toolbar. The “Fill Color” command will be added to the Customize Quick Access Toolbar.

You can see the “Fill Color” command added to the Quick Access Toolbar below and the existing commands. Since this is the last item added to the Quick Access Toolbar, it will appear in the listed order.

To reorder the added items, you can use the up and down arrow highlighted on the right to the list of items.

The selected format will be applied to the Quick Access Toolbar by pressing the OK button. The “Fill Color” Command is visible before the “New File” Tool.

You can see the visibility order of the listed tools is changed. According to the new list order, the “Fill Color” position has been changed to the second last from the end.

Example #3

Removing Command

The commands can be removed from the quick access toolbar if you are no longer using them or not using them frequently. The commands can be removed similarly to how you added the commands to the Quick Access Toolbar.

A new window will show the already added commands on the right side. This is the list of commands already in the quick access toolbar.

Select the command which you want to remove from the quick access toolbar. In the center, below the add button, a Remove button will be enabled. Press the OK button to make the applied changes.

The Fill Color command is removed and will disappear from the Quick Access Toolbar, as shown below.

Example #4

Moving the Position

According to your convenience, you can change the position of the toolbar. You can change the position from top to below the ribbon or vice versa.

Select the downward-facing arrow at the end of the toolbar, then select the Show Below Ribbon option from the list.

Now the Toolbar is moved below the ribbon.

Example #5

Adding Ribbon Commands

The command will be added to the Quick Access Toolbar as below.

Things to Remember

Similar to the name Quick Access Toolbar, this is a customizable toolbar to access the tools easily.

It is possible to add any of the available commands in Excel to the Excel Toolbar.

The visibility of the toolbar can be set above or below the ribbon.

Recommended Articles

This has been a guide to Toolbar in Excel. Here we have discussed How to Use and Customize the Toolbar in Excel and practical examples. You can also go through our other suggested articles –

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Excel Toolbar Not Working

Fix Excel Toolbar not working

The Excel toolbar may not be working on your Windows 11/10 PC due to various reasons. One primary reason is a corrupt Excel toolbar file. Other reasons could be damaged system files, customized add-ins, or conflicting third-party apps.  

Reset toolbar settings.

Rename the corrupt toolbar file.

Troubleshoot Excel in Safe mode.

Repair Microsoft Excel.

Troubleshoot in a Clean Boot state.

Let us see these in detail.

1] Reset toolbar settings

Start by resetting the customizations you have made to the Excel toolbar.  

Select All Tabs in the Customize the Ribbon dropdown on the right-hand side.

Make sure all the options are selected in the list box just beneath the dropdown.

This will delete all the customizations for Ribbon and Quick Access toolbar tabs and reset the default settings for the program. Once you do this, try using Excel again and see if it fixes the issue.

2] Rename the corrupt toolbar file

If the issue is due to a corrupt toolbar file, fixing it may resolve the problem. When you rename a corrupt toolbar file, Excel rebuilds a new toolbar when it restarts.

Open File Explorer and copy-paste the following in the address bar: %AppData%MicrosoftExcel.

Locate the chúng tôi or chúng tôi file (for Excel 2013, 2023, and 2023/365).

Rename the file as Excel.xlb.old or Excel15.xlb.old and press the Enter key.

Reboot your PC.

Restart Excel and see if the issue is fixed.

Also Read: Best Excel Repair Tools & Methods to repair corrupted Excel file.

3] Troubleshoot Excel in Safe mode

If the issue persists, try starting Microsoft Excel in Safe Mode. Safe mode is a diagnostic mode in which the program starts with basic features. Safe mode checks for corrupted resource files, registry entries, or templates. It also disables all the add-ins and menu customizations, so that you may enable them one by one (manually) to identify the problematic item.

From this list, select one item and enable it. See if it causes the problem. If it doesn’t cause the problem, enable another item. Keep doing this until you find the problematic item. If you find one, consider removing it.

Close Excel to exit the safe mode.

4] Repair Microsoft Excel

Next, repair the Microsoft Excel program using Microsoft’s Quick Repair/Online Repair tool. This will attempt to repair any corrupt program files if Excel is not working correctly.

Close Microsoft Excel.

Make sure you’re connected to a stable internet connection.

Press the Win key on your keyboard.

Select Settings.

 In the search bar on top, type ‘microsoft office’

The search results will show the Office version installed on your system.

Select Yes in the UAC prompt that appears.

Follow any on-screen instructions and wait for the repair process to finish.

Restart Excel and see if the issue is fixed.

Note: The above process will repair the entire Office suite. If you have Excel installed as a standalone application, you can search for it and repair it individually.

5] Troubleshoot in a Clean Boot state

If the above solutions won’t help, the root cause may lie with some external application rather than Excel itself. If that’s the case, troubleshooting Windows in a Clean Boot state may help identify the conflicting third-party app. 

Only Microsoft services are made to run during a clean boot so that the non-Microsoft product that’s causing software conflicts may be identified. Once you enter the Clean Boot state (by disabling the non-Microsoft services and startup programs), try using Excel again. If the toolbar works properly, you can rest assured the issue is with some third-party app or service. Now you have to re-enable the services and startup programs one by one to pinpoint the problem. Once you find the conflicting app, consider removing it from your Windows 11/10 PC.

Hope the above solutions will help resolve the Excel toolbar not working issue. 

How do I enable the toolbar in Excel?

Read Next: Excel filter not working properly.

How To Customize Your Google’s Discover Feed In Android

Google’s Discover feed – currently available on most Android phones via the Google app – is designed to make exploring personal interests easier. The tool enables mobile device owners to get updates for their passions without searching. Since Discover is all about you and your interests, the tech giant has included a handful of ways to help you customize what you see. In this article we explore how to customize your Google’s Discover feed to make sure you never miss an article of interest again.

Where Can You Find the Discover Tab?

You can access Discover through several avenues on your phone or tablet. For starters, you can open the Google app which comes pre-installed on most Android devices. Alternatively, on some phones, all it takes to find Discover is to swipe left from your device’s home screen.

For those of you using Chrome on your handset, the Discover feed can also be brought up by opening a new tab. You should be able to see it below the search bar.

How Does Google Select What to Show You in Discover?

Google uses the information it collects from your device and other Google products you use to decide what to show you in Discover. Moreover, Google taps the data stored in your Google Account.

The bulk of data is accumulated via “Web & App Activity” which saves your queries, browsing histories, and other activities linked to your Google Account. For those who are uncomfortable with Google knowing all this information, keep in mind that the feature can be turned off and back on again.

Additionally, Google collects app and device info from your devices and uses your location history to construct your own personalized Discover feed that targets your unique interests.

How to Customize Discover

First, you will need to make sure the “Web & App Activity” service is turned on because without it there can be no Discover.

In the Google App

1. Open the Google app on your device.

2. Tap More at the bottom of the screen.

3. Select “Your data in Search.”

4. Scroll down until you find the Google-wide controls section.

5. Turn Web & App Activity on.

In Your Browser

1. Log in to your Google account.

2. Tap on the Google Account icon at the top of the page.

4. Find the “Activity Controls” section.

5. Turn Web & App Activity on.

Select What Google Shows You in Discover

While Google does a fairly good job of predicting which articles may be of interest to you, you may still find that your Discover feed lacks in certain areas. Or perhaps it is showing some stories you are not really interested in. In these cases, it’s up to you to make the necessary adjustments.

Follow New Topics

You can easily follow new topics in your feed. The process is quite straightforward.

1. Head to Discover on your Android device.

2. Search for an interest, like a TV show or author.

3. You should see a Follow button in the card’s upper-right corner. Tap on the “+” to add this interest to your Discover list. Note that not all queries will display the Follow button.

Unfollow Topics

If Google is showing topics you don’t really care for in your Discover feed, it’s time to take action and unfollow them.

1. Head to Discover on your Android device.

2. Tap on More at the bottom of the display.

4. Scroll down until you find “Based on Your Activity.”

5. Tap on the remove button to stop following a certain topic.

Another way of doing this is to unfollow topics directly from the Discover feed. You’ll notice each card has a three-button menu located in the lower-right corner. Tap on it and choose one of the available options:

Hide this story – to hide it from your feed

Not interested in the topic – to unfollow the topic

Stop seeing stories from a certain source – to unfollow the source

Manage interests – to go directly to Your Interests

Bring Back Topics that Were Previously Removed

Have you changed your mind and want to bring back stories on a certain topic? The good news is that Google hides the topics you unfollowed in a folder, so you can retrieve them quickly.

1. Go to Discover on your Android device.

2. Tap on More at the bottom of the display.

4. Tap unhide on the topic you want to bring back.

Change How Often You See Certain Topics

Perhaps you’re passionate about the TV show Grey’s Anatomy and want to see more stories about it in your feed. If that’s the case, you can opt to find more.

1. Go to Discover on your Android device.

2. Tap on the Control (middle) option located on the bottom right of each card.

3. Tap More (blue dot) to find more cards for this topic.

Alternatively, if you don’t want to unfollow a topic but want to see less of it in your feed, tap Less (red dot).

How to Turn Off Discover

For those who don’t want to see the personalized feed with stories based on your interests, know you can turn Discover off altogether with a few easy taps.

1. Go to Discover on your Android device.

2. Tap on More at the bottom of the screen.

4. Toggle off Discover.

If you’re looking to improve your experience when using Google’s features and apps, you may be interested to learning how to back up Google Photos to your computer, how to enable Google Assistant Ambient Mode or how to customize Gmail notifications for Android.

Alexandra Arici

Alexandra is passionate about mobile tech and can be often found fiddling with a smartphone from some obscure company. She kick-started her career in tech journalism in 2013, after working a few years as a middle-school teacher. Constantly driven by curiosity, Alexandra likes to know how things work and to share that knowledge with everyone.

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How To Create Graphs In Excel?

Types of Graphs in Excel

We have seen multiple uses of Excel in our professional lives; it helps us analyze, sort, and extract insights from data. One feature of Excel helps us put insights gained from our data into a visual form. This feature helps us display data in an easy to understand pictorial format. We are talking about graphs in Excel. Excel supports most of the commonly used graphs in statistics.

Creating different types of graphs in Excel according to our data is very easy and convenient when it comes to analysis, comparing datasets, presentations, etc. In this article, we will discuss the six most commonly used types of graphs in Excel. We will also discuss selecting the correct graph type for some data.

Common Types of Graphs in Excel

The most common types of graphs used in Excel are:

Pie Graph

Column Graph

Line Graph

Area Graph

Scatter Graph

Let’s understand Excel’s different types of graphs and how to create them. We will start with a few examples of types of graphs in Excel.

You can download this Types of Graphs Excel Template here – Types of Graphs Excel Template

1. The Pie Graph

As the name suggests, the pie graph displays data as a pie or circle. This graph type is used for showing the proportions of a whole. For example, if we want to compare who did how much work in a team, we would use a pie graph to display it in an easy way to understand.

So our data looks like this:

It would now look like this:

We can also use different types of pie graphs, such as a 3D pie graph, pie of pie, bar of pie, or doughnut graph, to represent the same data.

2. The Column or Bar Graph

The next one in the list is a column graph, also called a bar graph in statistics. We use these different types of graphs to see and compare values across a range. The same data that we used in the pie graph example would look like this:

Different bar graphs are available in Excel, such as stacked columns, 100% stacked column, 3D columns, etc. These types of graphs can be used for expanded datasets. For example, we have been working with only two columns in the last two examples, now; if we want to include the hours worked as a third column and compare the hours worked with the number of datasets visually, we can either use a stacked column or a 100% stacked column which would look like this:

The difference between these is that while a stacked column represents actual values, a 100% stacked column represents the values as percentages. There are 3D version as well as horizontal versions of these graphs in Excel.

3. The Line Graph

The next type of graph we are going to discuss is called a line graph. This type of graph is used when we need to visualize data like an increasing or decreasing series over a period. This is an excellent Excel graph for representing trends and comparing performance. For example, if we wanted to see how the current rise compares to the last raise for different people in the earlier examples, we would get something like this:

We can see that Rohit is the only one whose pay raise has increased, while other’s pay raise percentages have remained constant over the last year. We have different line graphs or line graphs available in excel, such as stacked and 100% stacked lines.

Stacked lines like stacked columns represent percentages instead of actual values.

4. The Area Graph

The area graph is available within the line graph menu. This is used for the same purpose as the line graph, which visualizes trends and compares data. In this example, we represent the relationship between the number of datasets worked on by an analyst and the number of hours they worked.

The stacked area graph on the right is used to draw attention to the difference in magnitude of the two categories and displays the values as percentages.

5. The Scatter Graph

The Scatter graph is a simple representation of data points in Excel. It is used when we need to compare at least two sets of data with a limited number of data points.

Many more types of graphs are available in Excel, such as Hierarchy graph, Radar graph, Waterfall graph, and Combo graphs which are combinations of two or more graphs. All these are used based on specific conditions fulfilled by the data, such as the type of data, the number of data points, etc.

How to Create Graphs in Excel?

Now that we have gone through a few examples of types of graphs in Excel, we will learn how to make these graphs. The same procedure is used to make all the graphs. They are enumerated sequentially below:

1. First, choose the data you want to represent in the graph. In this case, we will select Analyst and Datasets from the practice table:

3. Select the required graph from the different types of graphs; in this case, we are making a bar graph which is a horizontal column graph, but you can select any graph that suits the data you are working on:

Things to Remember

Know your data before making a graph. A type of graph that may suit a time series may not be suitable for a set of unpatterned data.

Sort the data before making graphs.

Do not use unnecessary styling while making the graph.

Recommended Articles

This has been a guide to Types of Graphs in Excel. Here we discussed Different types of Graphs in Excel and how to create these different types of Graphs in Excel, along with practical examples and a downloadable Excel template. You can also go through our other suggested articles –

Ipmt In Excel How To Use Ipmt Function In Excel? (With Examples)

IPMT Function in Excel

IPMT Function calculates a specific portion of interest based on the loan amount and tenure. The syntax of IPMT is quite similar to the syntax of PV Function in Excel, which all have seen earlier. To understand better, IPMT helps used to distinguish between different portions or segments of any loan and to what time how small amount is to be paid based on the interest applicable can be calculated.

IPMT Formula in Excel:

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Explanation of IPMT Function in Excel

There are six parameters used for the IPMT function. Four parameters are compulsory, and two are optional.

Parameter details are as follows:

Compulsory Parameters:

Rate: The interest rate per period.

Per: The period for which you want to find the interest and must be in the range 1 to n per.

Nper: The total number of payment periods in an annuity.

Pv: The present value, or the lump-sum amount that a series of future payments is worth right now.

Optional Parameters:

[FV]: It is an optional argument. The FV or a cash balance you want to attain after the last payment is made. If FV is omitted, excel assumes it to be 0 (the future value of a loan, for example, is 0).

[Type]: This is also an optional argument. The number 0 or 1 indicates when payments are due. If this argument is omitted, Excel assumes it to be 0.

The Type can be 0 or 1, where:

1 = The payment is made at the start of the period.

How to Use the IPMT Function in Excel?

IPMT function in Excel can be used as a worksheet function and a VBA Function. Here are some examples of the IPMT functions to understand the working of the IPMT function in Excel.

You can download this IPMT Function in Excel Template here – IPMT Function in Excel Template

Example #1

Interest payment made for months 1 and 2 of a loan of $70,000, which is to be paid after 6 years. An interest rate of 6% per year, and the payment to the loan is to be made at the end of each month.

Result is :

To convert the annual interest rate of 6% into the monthly rate (=6%/12) and the number of periods from years to months (=6*12).

Example #2

Interest during quarters 1 and 2 of an investment is required to increase investment from $0 to $6,000 over 3 years. The interest rate of 4.5% per year, and the payment into the investment is to be made at the beginning of each quarter.

Result is :

The annual interest rate has been converted into a quarterly rate (4.5%/4)

The number of periods has been converted from years to quarters (=3*4).

The [type]argument has been set to 1 to indicate that the payment will be made at the start of each quarter.

The interest for the first quarter is zero, as the first payment is made at the start of the quarter.

Note:

* Use N%/12 for rate and N*12 for nper when there are monthly payments. N%/4 for rate and N*4 for nper when quarterly payments and N% for rate and N for nper when there are annual payments.

*Cash paid out is shown as negative numbers. Cash received is shown as positive numbers.

Things to Remember

Below are a few error details that can come in the IPMT function as the wrong argument will be passed in the functions.

2. Error handling #VALUE!: IPMT function through a #VALUE! Error when any non-numeric.

VBA Function Example: 

The IPMT function can also be used in VBA code.

For example:

Recommended Articles

This has been a guide to IPMT in Excel. Here we discuss the IPMT Formula in Excel and how to use the IPMT function in Excel, along with practical examples and downloadable Excel templates. You can also go through our other suggested articles –

How To Use Val Function In Excel Vba With Excel Template

VBA Val Function

VBA Val stands for Value. It converts the arrays or string which has some numbers into pure numerical values. Suppose if we give “111 One” as input then we will get only “111” as numerical output. This is quite useful while working in a data which we extract from some kind of database. In that database file, we may encounter such cells which may contain numbers along with extra spaces, hidden characters, special characters or alphabets. In that case, using Val can convert that string into numbers. Which can be used in further analysis.

How to Use Excel Val Function in VBA?

Let’s see the examples of Val in Excel VBA.

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You can download this VBA VAL Excel Template here – VBA VAL Excel Template

Example #1 – VBA Val

It is quite easy to implement. For multiple types of applications and codes, we will first form a frame of code which we will be using multiple times in further examples.

Step 1: Go to Insert menu tab and select a Module as shown below.

Step 2: After that, we will get the blank window of Module. In that, write the sub category of VBA Val in excel or you can use any other name of subcategory as per your need.

Code:

Sub

VBA_Val()

End Sub

Code:

Sub

VBA_Val()

Dim

A

As Variant

End Sub

Step 4: And now assign any type of number sequence to variable A under VBA function VAL. We have assigned a combination of sequential number for demonstration as shown below with spaces between them.

Code:

Sub

VBA_Val() Dim A As Variant A = Val("11 22 33")

End Sub

Step 5: At last we will need a message box to print the values stored in variable A.

Code:

Sub

VBA_Val()

Dim

A

As Variant

A = Val("11 22 33") MsgBox A

End Sub

Example #2 – VBA Val

In this example, we will see how VBA Val function is used for number containing some mathematical signs. For this, we will consider the code written above. We have taken out the frame of the code which will be used all the examples, as shown below.

Step 1: Go to Insert menu tab and select a Module as shown below

Step 2: As highlighted in the below screenshot, we will keep updating the value between brackets of VAL Function.

Code:

Sub

VBA_Val2()

Dim

A

As Variant

A = Val("") MsgBox A

End Sub

Step 3: Now let’s insert any number with mathematical sign plus (“+”) as shown below.

Code:

Sub

VBA_Val2()

Dim

A

As Variant

A = Val("+111") MsgBox A

End Sub

Step 4: Now compile and run the code. We will see, VBA Val has given the values as 111 without the plus sign. It is because logically all the values with or without plus signs are always positive in nature.

Step 5: Let’s change the value in Val function from +111 to -111. Now we will see if minus sign gets converted into the value or not.

Code:

Sub

VBA_Val2()

Dim

A

As Variant

A = Val("-111") MsgBox A

End Sub

Step 6: Compile the code and run. We will see, the minus sign is still retained in the value and message box has returned the value as -111. Which means any sign other than plus will not get converted with Val function in VBA.

Example #3 – VBA Val

In this example, we will see, how Val function would work for time formats.

Step 1: For this again we will use the above-defined format for Excel VBA Val as shown below.

Code:

Sub

VBA_Val3()

Dim

A

As Variant

A = Val("") MsgBox A

End Sub

Step 2: Now insert any time format in VAL function as circled in the above screenshot. Here we are adding 11 AM as shown below.

Code:

Sub

VBA_Val3()

Dim

A

As Variant

A = Val("11 AM") MsgBox A

End Sub

Step 3: Now compile the code and run. We will see, VAL function has eliminated AM from 11 AM and given us only 11 as output as shown below.

Step 4: Now let’s use some different format. Use any minutes with hours. We have used value 11:05 under Val brackets.

Code:

Sub

VBA_Val3()

Dim

A

As Variant

A = Val("11:05 AM") MsgBox A

End Sub

Step 5: Again compile and run the code. Again Val function has removed colon and minutes numbers along with AM and given us the whole number 11 as shown below.

Example #4 – VBA Val

In this example, we will see how the date format works in this.

Code:

Sub

VBA_Val4()

Dim

A

As Variant

A = Val("") MsgBox A

End Sub

Step 2: Now insert any date format as per your need. We can insert data in a hyphen (“-“) format in a slash (“ / “) format. Let’s use the slash date format which is most often used.

Code:

Sub

VBA_Val4()

Dim

A

As Variant

A = Val("06/26/2023") MsgBox A

End Sub

Step 3: Now compile the code and run it. We will see VBA Val has returned the numerical values as “6”. Values after slash are not accepted by VBA Val.

Example #5 – VBA Val

In this example, we will see how this will work when the numbers are after the text.

Step 1: Take the format which we have seen above.

Code:

Sub

VBA_Val2()

Dim

A

As Variant

A = Val("") MsgBox A

End Sub

Step 2: In Val function brackets, let’s put some text and numbers. Let’s consider “AB 11” as shown below.

Code:

Sub

VBA_Val2()

Dim

A

As Variant

A = Val("AB 11") MsgBox A

End Sub

Step 3: Now run it. We will see, in the message box, only 0 is appearing. Which means VBA Val doesn’t consider the numbers after characters or text.

Pros of VBA Val

It can be used in the data which is extracted from some kind of tool or database. Which consists of different kind of characters along with numbers.

It is quite easy to separate numbers by using VBA Val in any kind data.

We can choose any format which consists of a number or set of number to separate it from other characters.

Things to Remember

It also considers the decimals.

Save the file as Marco enable excel so that written would be retained.

If record this process in VBA, then obtained code will be much lengthier than the examples which we have seen above.

There is not an alternate insert function available in Excel which gives the same result as VBA Val.

Recommended Articles

This is a guide to VBA Val. Here we discuss how to get Val in VBA Excel along with practical examples and downloadable excel template. You can also go through our other suggested articles –

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