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In this tutorial, we will see different approaches to finding unique characters in a string. Simply say when a character once occurred in the string then it will not be included in the string again.

Example

Input

Output

Method 1: Using the Set

So, in this approach, we will use a set data structure as you know it contains only unique elements inside it. So, we will take input from the user then we will convert that into an array by splitting then we will create a new set and put all the elements into that and again we will take back all the elements from the set to string and it will be containing only unique elements.

Syntax

Following is the syntax to find unique characters of a string:

val1

=

val1

.

split

(

""

)

val1

=

new

Set

(

val1

)

val1

=[...

val1

].

join

(

""

)

Algorithm

STEP 1 − Create a variable and assign a string. Alternative assign the string value taken from user input.

STEP 2 − Apply the split(“”) method on the string to split it into an array of characters.

STEP 3 − Define a new set passing the array of characters as the argument. The new set will contain only unique characters.

STEP 4 − Join the characters from the set to create again a string.

STEP 5 − Display the string.

Example

Let’s see the program to find unique characters of a string using Set.

function

calculate

(

)

{

val1

=

document

.

getElementById

(

‘val1’

)

.

value val1

=

val1

.

split

(

“”

)

val1

=

new

Set

(

val1

)

val1

=

[

val1

]

.

join

(

“”

)

document

.

getElementById

(

‘calcOutput’

)

.

innerHTML

=

val1

}

Method 2: Loop with the indexOf() Method

We will take a variable and while iterating through the string we will check for the current character if it is occurring the first time that means the character at that position is -1 in the string then we will include that character else we will ignore it.

Syntax

Following is the syntax to find unique characters of a string using indexOf() method:

for

(

var

i

=

0

;

i

<

val1

.

length

;

i

++){

if

(

UniqueAns

.

indexOf

(

val1

.

charAt

(

i

))==-

1

)

UniqueAns

=

UniqueAns

+

val1

[

i

];

}

Example

In the following program, we use the indexOf() method to find the unique characters in the string.

function

calculate

(

)

{

val1

=

document

.

getElementById

(

‘val1’

)

.

value

var

UniqueAns

=

“”

;

for

(

var

i

=

0

;

i

<

val1

.

length

;

i

++

)

{

if

(

UniqueAns

.

indexOf

(

val1

.

charAt

(

i

)

)

==

1

)

UniqueAns

=

UniqueAns

+

val1

[

i

]

;

}

document

.

getElementById

(

‘calcOutput’

)

.

innerHTML

=

UniqueAns

}

Method 3: Using Loop with includes() Method

This is similar to the above approach but here we will use the includes method to check if the string contains the current char if it returns true then ignore it else if the function returns false it means we have visited this char for the first time so include it.

Syntax

Following is the syntax to find unique characters of a string:

for

(

var

i

=

0

;

i

<

val1

.

length

;

i

++){

if

(

UniqueAns

.

includes

(

val1

[

i

])==

false

)

UniqueAns

=

UniqueAns

+

val1

[

i

];

}

Example

In the following program, we use the includes() method to find the unique characters in the string.

function

calculate

(

)

{

val1

=

document

.

getElementById

(

‘val1’

)

.

value

var

UniqueAns

=

“”

;

for

(

var

i

=

0

;

i

<

val1

.

length

;

i

++

)

{

if

(

UniqueAns

.

includes

(

val1

[

i

]

)

==

false

)

UniqueAns

=

UniqueAns

+

val1

[

i

]

;

}

document

.

getElementById

(

‘calcOutput’

)

.

innerHTML

=

UniqueAns

}

You're reading How To Find Unique Characters Of A String In Javascript?

How To Find The Name Of The First Form In A Document With Javascript?

Document.forms Syntax

The following syntax will show how we can use the forms property to access the name of the first form of the document using JavaScript.

let formName = document.forms[0].name;

In the above syntax, we used square brackets syntax to access the first element of the collection and then used the name property to get its name.

Steps

Step 1 − In the first step, we need to define two or more form tags in the document and then access all of them using the forms property of JavaScript.

Step 2 − In the next step, we will use the above syntax to get the name of the first form in the document.

Step 3 − In the third step, we will display the number of forms as well as the name of the first form in the document on the user screen using JavaScript.

Let us understand it practically with the help of a code example −

Example 1

The example below will illustrate the practical implementation of the forms property to find the name of the first form in the document using JavaScript −

let

formElem

=

document

.

forms

;

let

firstForm

=

formElem

[

0

]

.

name

;

“The name of first form in the document: “

+

firstForm

;

In the example above, we have used two forms named as formOne and formTwo in the document. We access a list of all forms present in the document inside form, that will be of type HTMLCollection.After that, we access the first element of the list using square brackets syntax to get the first form in the document and use the name property to get the name of the form inside firstForm.

Let us see what value the forms property will return if we have two nested forms in the document.

Approach

Step 1 − In this step, we will define the two forms one inside another such that nested forms and give them particular names.

Step 2 − In second step, we use the forms property to get the list of forms present in the document as we did in previous example.

Step 3 − In third step, we will access the name of the first form using the name property and display it on the user screen using JavaScript.

Example 2

Below example will show how the forms property will react in case of nested forms −

let

form

=

document

.

forms

;

let

firstForm

=

form

[

0

]

.

name

;

“The name of first form in the document: “

+

firstForm

;

In this example, we have seen that forms property consider the nested forms as single form and returns the name of the first form in the document whether it contain nested forms or not.

After reading this tutorial, one can able to find the name of the first form in the document using the forms property of JavaScript. We also learnt about a new data type HTMLCollection that is very much similar to the array data type in JavaScript and also about the reaction of the forms property in case we have nested forms in the document.

Golang Program To Get Characters From A String Using The Index

In Golang, there are various methods to get characters from a string with the help of an index. In this article, we are using external functions as well as by using internal functions defined in the go language.

Method 1: Using User-Defined Function

In this method, the function that we create will take the string whose character is to be determined along with the integer type index of the string and will return the character of the string present at that index.

Algorithm

Step 1 − First, we need to import the fmt package.

Step 2 − Then, create a function that will take the string whose character is to be determined as an argument along with the index.

Step 3 − Start the main() function.

Step 4 − Inside the main() initialize a variable of type string and assign a value to it.

Step 5 − Print the variable on the screen.

Step 6 − Initialize a variable of type int and assign it an index value

Step 7 − Now, call the getChar() function by passing the character as well as the index as arguments to the function.

Step 8 − Store the result obtained by the function in a variable in string format.

Step 9 − Print this value on the screen by using fmt.Println() function.

Example

In this example we will use a user defined external function to get the characters from the strings

package main import "fmt" func getChar(str string, index int) rune { return []rune(str)[index] } func main() { var str string = "Prevention is better than cure" fmt.Println("The given string is:", str) var index int = 24 var result string = string(getChar(str, index)) fmt.Println("The character at index", index, "is:", result) } Output The given string is: Prevention is better than cure The character at index 24 is: n Method 2: Using Split() Function

We will use the internal function in order to get the array of characters present in the string then by using the index we can grab the character value present at that index.

Syntax func Split(str, sep string) []string

Split() function is used to split a string through a provided separator. This function is present in strings package and it accepts the string to split as an argument along with a separator. The function then returns the final array of strings as a result.

func Index(s, substr string) int

The index() function is present in strings package and is used to get the index of the first occurrence of a given substring. The function takes two values as arguments. One is the string and other is the substring whose occurrence is to be detected. The function then returns the first occurrence of that substring in integer format.

Algorithm

Step 1 − First, we need to import the fmt and strings package.

Step 2 − Then, start the main() function. Inside the main() initialize a variable of type string and assign a value to it.

Step 3 − Further, print the string on the screen and assign a variable of type int and store an integer value at which the character is to be obtained.

Step 4 − Now, use the split() function present in strings package to get the array of characters of the given string.

Step 5 − Now, use the index initialized above to get the character present at that value from the array of characters and store that character in a separate variable.

Step 6 − We have now achieved the character that we wanted to get. Print the character on the screen by using fmt.Println() function.

Example 1

In this example we will use the split() function present in strings package in order to convert the characters from the string.

package main import ( "fmt" "strings" ) func main() { var str string = "Prevention is better than cure" fmt.Println("The given string is:", str) var index int = 7 chars := strings.Split(str, "") var result string = chars[index] fmt.Println("The character at index", index, "is:", result) } Output The given string is: Prevention is better than cure The character at index 7 is: i Example 2 package main import ( "fmt" "strings" ) func main() { var str string = "Prevention is better than cure" fmt.Println("The given string is:", str) var index int = 17 var result string = string(str[strings.Index(str, string(str[index]))]) fmt.Println("The character at index", index, "is:", result) } Output The given string is: Prevention is better than cure The character at index 17 is: t Conclusion

We have successfully compiled and executed a Go language Program to get characters from a string using the index along with examples. Here we have compiled three examples in the first one we are using an external function to achieve the result while in the second and third we are using library functions present in go language for the same.

How To Find A File In Linux Using The Find Command

The Linux find command is one of the most important and handy commands in Linux systems. It can, as the name suggests, find files on your Linux PC based on pretty much whatever conditions and variables you set. You can find files by permissions, users, groups, file type, date, size and other possible criteria using the find command. Here we show you how to find a file in Linux using the find command.

The find command is available on most Linux distro by default, so you do not have to install a package for it.

Find Files by Name in Current Directories

The most obvious way of searching for files is by name. To find a file by name in the current directory, run:

find

.

-name

chúng tôi you want to find a file by name that contains both capital and small letters, run:

find

.

-iname

chúng tôi you want to find a file in the root directory, prefix your search with sudo, which will give you all the permissions required to do so, and also the / symbol, which tells Linux to search in the root directory. Finally, the -print expression displays the directories of your search results. If you were looking for Gzip, you’d type:

sudo

find

/

-name

gzip

-print

Find Files Under Specific Directory

If you want to find files under a specific directory like “/home,” run:

find

/

home

-name

chúng tôi you want to find files with the “.txt” extension under the “/home” directory, run:

find

/

home

-name

"*.txt"

To find files whose name is “test.txt” under multiple directories like “/home” and “/opt”, run:

find

/

home

/

opt

-name

chúng tôi find hidden files in the “/home” directory, run:

find

/

home

-name

".*"

To find a single file called “test.txt” and remove it, run:

find

/

home

-type

f

-name

chúng tôi

-exec

rm

-f

{

}

To find all empty files under the “/opt” directory, run:

find

/

opt

-type

f

-empty

Find Directories Using Name

If you want to find all directories whose name is “testdir” under the “/home” directory, run:

find

/

home

-type

d

-name

testdir

To file all empty directories under “/home,” run:

find

/

home

-type

d

-empty

Find Files with Certain Permissions

The find command can be used to find files with a specific permission using the perm option.

To find all files whose permissions are “777” in the “/home” directory, run:

find

/

home

-type

f

-perm

0777

-print

To find all the files without permission “777,” run:

find

.

-type

f

!

-perm

777

To find all read-only files, run:

find

/

home

-perm

/

u

=r

To find all executable files, run:

find

/

home

-perm

/

a

=x

To find all the sticky bit set files whose permissions are “553,” run:

find

/

home

-perm

1553

To find all SUID set files, run:

find

/

home

-perm

/

u

=s

To find all files whose permissions are “777” and change their permissions to “700,” run:

find

/

home

-type

f

-perm

0777

-print

-exec

chmod

700

{

}

; Find Files and Directories Based on Date and Time

To find all the files under “/opt” which were modified 20 days earlier, run:

find

/

opt

-mtime

20

To find all the files under “/opt” which were accessed twenty days earlier, run:

find

/

opt

-atime

20

To find all the files under “/opt” which were modified more than 30 days earlier and less than 50 days after:

find

/

opt

-mtime

+

30

-mtime

-50

To find all the files under “/opt” which were changed in the last two hours, run:

find

/

opt

-cmin

-120

Find Files and Directories Based on Size

To find all 10MB files under the “/home” directory, run:

find

/

home

-size

10M

To find all the files under the “/home” directory which are greater than 10MB and less than 50MB, run:

find

/

home

-size

+10M

-size

-50M

To find all “.mp4” files under the “/home” directory with more than 10MB and delete them using a single command, run:

find

/

home

-type

f

-name

*

.mp4

-size

+10M

-exec

rm

{

}

;

As you can see, the find command is incredibly useful for administering a system, looking through directories to find files, and generally pruning the virtual directory tree in Linux. If you enjoyed this Linux article, make sure you check out some of our other Linux content, like how to use the scp command to securely transfer files, how to use nnn as a file manager in the terminal, and how to fix broken packages.

John Perkins

John is a young technical professional with a passion for educating users on the best ways to use their technology. He holds technical certifications covering topics ranging from computer hardware to cybersecurity to Linux system administration.

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How To Perform String Comparison In Typescript?

In this TypeScript tutorial, users will learn to make string comparisons. The string comparison is the basic operation required while working with any programming language.

Suppose we are developing a web or Android application and need to compare string data such as user id, user name, password, etc. In such cases, string comparison becomes very useful.

Using the strict equality (===) operator

The best way to compare the strings in TypeScript is to use the strict equality operator. The strict equality operator first checks the types of the left and right operands, and if it matches, it compares the value of the string and returns the boolean value based on the match of the string.

Users can follow the syntax below to compare the strings using the strict equality operator in TypeScript.

Syntax let string1: string = " "; let string2: string = " "; let value: boolean = string1 === string2;

In the above syntax, we have created the two strings and compared them using the strict equality operator.

Steps

STEP 1 − Create two different strings – ‘string1’, and ‘string2’.

STEP 2 − Assign the comparison result of ‘string1’ and ‘string2’ into the ‘value1’ boolean variable.

STEP 3 − As a final step, we print the value of ‘value1’. If the value of ‘value1’ is ‘true’ then the strings are ‘equal’ else, they are ‘not equal’.

Example 1

In the example below, we compare two strings- string1 and string2. We have taken both strings as the same, so we expect the output to be ‘true’.

let string1: string = "TutorialsPoint"; let string2: string = "TutorialsPoint"; let value1: boolean = string1 === string2; console.log(value1);

On compiling, it will generate the following JavaScript code −

var string1 = "TutorialsPoint"; var string2 = "TutorialsPoint"; var value1 = string1 === string2; console.log(value1);

The above code will produce the following output −

Output true Example 2

In the example below, we compare two strings- string1 and string2. We have taken both strings as different, so we expect the output to be ‘false’.

let string1: string = "TutorialsPoint"; let string2: string = "Tutorial"; let value1: boolean = string1 === string2; console.log(value1);

On compiling, it will generate the following JavaScript code −

var string1 = "TutorialsPoint"; var string2 = "Tutorial"; var value1 = string1 === string2; console.log(value1);

The above code will produce the following output −

Output false Using the strict equality operator to do case-insensitive string comparison

Sometimes, we require to compare the string case-insensitively. The case-insensitive string comparison means all characters of both strings are the same but not the case for all characters of strings.

Users can follow the syntax below to compare the strings case-insensitively.

Syntax let string1: string = "TUTORIALSPOINT"; let string2: string = "tutorialspoint"; let value1: boolean = string1.toLowerCase() === string2.toLowerCase(); let value2: boolean = string1.toUpperCase() === string2.toUpperCase();

First, we have converted the strings to lowercase in the above syntax and compared them. Also, we have converted the strings in uppercase and compared them.

Steps

STEP 1 − Create two strings – ‘str1’ and ‘str2’, containing the same value but with different cases. 

STEP 2 − Next, convert the ‘str1’ and ‘str2’ to lowercase, or uppercase.

STEP 3 − Compare them using the strict equality operator, and stored its result in the `val1` boolean variable.

STEP 4 − In the last step, we are also printing the value of the `val1`.

Example

To compare the strings case-insensitively, users can simply convert both strings into lowercase or uppercase and compare them. In the example below, we compare two strings containing the same value but with different cases.

let str1: string = "TUTORIALSPOINT"; let str2: string = "tutorialspoint"; let val1: boolean = str1.toLowerCase() === str2.toLowerCase(); let val2: boolean = str1.toUpperCase() === str2.toUpperCase(); console.log("After converting both strings into the lowercase, comparison result is : " + val1); console.log("After converting both strings into the lowercase, comparison result is : " + val2);

On compiling, it will generate the following JavaScript code −

var str1 = "TUTORIALSPOINT"; var str2 = "tutorialspoint"; var val1 = str1.toLowerCase() === str2.toLowerCase(); var val2 = str1.toUpperCase() === str2.toUpperCase(); console.log("After converting both strings into lowercase, comparison result is : " + val1); console.log("After converting both strings into uppercase, comparison result is : " + val2);

The above code will produce the following output −

Output After converting both strings into lowercase, comparison result is : true After converting both strings into uppercase, comparison result is : true

In the above output, users can see that value of the ‘val1’ and ‘val2’ is true as we are comparing both strings after converting into the same case, either lowercase or uppercase.

Using the loose equality (==) operator

Also, users can use the loose equality operator (==) to compare the strings. It will also give the same result as the strict equality operator gives, and it is the main benefit of TypeScript over JavaScript. Users can follow the Example below to compare the strings using the loose equality operator.

Example

In the below Example, users can see that we are comparing the ‘str1’ and ‘str2’ using the loose equality operator.

let str1: string = "Hello"; let str2: string = "World!"; let val1: boolean = str1 == str2; console.log(val1);

On compiling, it will generate the following JavaScript code −

var str1 = "Hello"; var str2 = "World!"; var val1 = str1 == str2; console.log(val1);

The above code will produce the following output −

Output false

Users learned to compare the strings in this tutorial. Unlike JavaScript, the strict and lose quality operator works the same for the string comparison as we define the data type of variables in TypeScript, and it doesn’t allow us to compare the variables of different data types.

Implementation Of Linkedlist In Javascript

A linked list is a data structure that consists of a sequence of elements, each of which contains a reference (or “link”) to the next element in the sequence. The first element is called the head and the last element is called the tail.

Defining the Node Class and the LinkedList class

This is basically the prerequisite in order to implement a linked list in JavaScript. In this step, 2 classes namely one for the nodes and the other for the linked list need to be created.

The Node class represents a single node in the linked list. It has two properties which are data and next. The data property is used to store the actual data of the node, whereas the next property is a reference to the next node in the list. The Node class consists of a constructor that initializes the data and next property when creating a new Node.

class Node { constructor(data) { chúng tôi = data; chúng tôi = null; } }

The LinkedList class is a representation of the linked list itself. It has a head property that refers to the first node in the list. The LinkedList class also has a constructor that initializes the head property when creating a new LinkedList.

class LinkedList { constructor() { chúng tôi = null; chúng tôi = null; this.length = 0; } }

The LinkedList class also consists of a method that allows you to insert, delete, and search for nodes in the list while simultaneously allowing other operations like printing the list, counting the elements, reversing the list and so on.

Printing the linked list

You can print the elements of a linked list by traversing through the list and printing the data of each node.

printAll() { let current = this.head; while (current) { console.log(current.data); current = current.next; } } Adding Node to the Linked List

There are multiple methods to add data to a linked list depending on where the new node has to be inserted, and are as follows −

Adding node to the beginning of the linked list

To add node/ element at the start of a linked list, once a new node is created with the data, simply set its next property to the current head of the list. Then you can update the head of the list to the new node. This is also known as Insertion at the head of the linked list and is the most basic type of addition of data. It is simply done by calling the add function defined below.

add(data) { const newNode = new Node(data); if (!this.head) { chúng tôi = newNode; chúng tôi = newNode; } else { chúng tôi = newNode; chúng tôi = newNode; } this.length++; return this; } Adding node to the end of the linked list

To add node/ element at the end of a linked list, we need to traverse the list and find the last node. After which a new node with data is created and we set the next property of the last node to the new node. This is also known as Insertion at the tail of the linked list and is the second most basic type of addition of data. It is simply done by calling the addToTail function defined below.

addToTail(data) { let newNode = new Node(data); if (this.head === null) { chúng tôi = newNode; return; } let current = this.head; while (current.next !== null) { current = current.next; } chúng tôi = newNode; } Adding node at a specific position

To add node/ element at a specific position in a linked list, you can traverse the list to find the node at the position before the insertion point, create a new node with the data, set the next property of the new node to the current node at the position, and set the next property of the previous node to the new node.

addAtPosition(data, position) { let newNode = new Node(data); if (position === 1) { chúng tôi = this.head; chúng tôi = newNode; return; } let current = this.head; let i = 1; while (i < position - 1 && current) { current = current.next; i++; } if (current) { chúng tôi = current.next; chúng tôi = newNode; } } Example (Adding Nodes to the Linked List)

In the below example, we implement adding nodes at beginning, at end and at a specific position.

class Node { constructor(data) { chúng tôi = data; chúng tôi = null; } } class LinkedList { constructor() { chúng tôi = null; chúng tôi = null; this.length = 0; } add(data) { const newNode = new Node(data); if (!this.head) { chúng tôi = newNode; chúng tôi = newNode; } else { chúng tôi = newNode; chúng tôi = newNode; } this.length++; return this; } addToTail(data) { let newNode = new Node(data); if (this.head === null) { chúng tôi = newNode; return; } let current = this.head; while (current.next !== null) { current = current.next; } chúng tôi = newNode; } addAtPosition(data, position) { let newNode = new Node(data); if (position === 1) { chúng tôi = this.head; chúng tôi = newNode; return; } let current = this.head; let i = 1; while (i < position - 1 && current) { current = current.next; i++; } if (current) { chúng tôi = current.next; chúng tôi = newNode; } } it printAll() { let current = this.head; while (current) { console.log(current.data); current = current.next; } } } const list = new LinkedList(); list.add("node1"); list.add("node2"); list.add("node3"); list.add("node4"); console.log("Initial List:"); list.printAll(); list.addAtPosition("nodex",2); list.printAll(); list.addToTail("nodey"); list.printAll(); Output Initial List: node1 node2 node3 node4 List after adding nodex at position 2 node1 nodex node2 node3 node4 List after adding nodey to tail node1 nodex node2 node3 node4 nodey Removing Node

Removal of data too, can be done via several methods depending upon the requirement.

Removing a specific node

To remove a specific node from a linked list, we need to traverse the list and find the node before the one you want to remove, update its next property to skip over the node you want to remove, and update the reference to the next node. This removes the node based upon the value.

remove(data) { if (!this.head) { return null; } if (this.head.data === data) { chúng tôi = this.head.next; this.length--; return this; } let current = this.head; while (current.next) { if (current.next.data === data) { chúng tôi = current.next.next; this.length--; return this; } current = current.next; } return null; } Removing a node at a Specific Position

To remove a node at a specific position in a linked list, we need to traverse the list and find the node before the one you want to remove, update its next property to skip over the node you want to remove, and update the reference to the next node. This is basically removing the node based upon the index value of it.

removeAt(index) { if (index === 0) return this.remove(); let current = this.head; for (let i = 0; i < index - 1; i++) { current = current.next; } chúng tôi = current.next.next; this.length--; return this; } Example (Removing Nodes from the Lined List)

In the below example, we implement removing a specific node and a node at a specific position.

class Node { constructor(data) { chúng tôi = data; chúng tôi = null; } } class LinkedList { constructor() { chúng tôi = null; chúng tôi = null; this.length = 0; } add(data) { const newNode = new Node(data); if (!this.head) { chúng tôi = newNode; chúng tôi = newNode; } else { chúng tôi = newNode; chúng tôi = newNode; } this.length++; return this; } remove(data) { if (!this.head) { return null; } if (this.head.data === data) { chúng tôi = this.head.next; this.length--; return this; } let current = this.head; while (current.next) { if (current.next.data === data) { chúng tôi = current.next.next; this.length--; return this; } current = current.next; } return null; } removeAt(index) { if (index === 0) return this.remove(); let current = this.head; for (let i = 0; i < index - 1; i++) { current = current.next; } chúng tôi = current.next.next; this.length--; return this; } printAll() { let current = this.head; while (current) { console.log(current.data); current = current.next; } } } const list = new LinkedList(); list.add("node1"); list.add("node2"); list.add("node3"); list.add("node4"); console.log("Initial List:"); list.printAll(); list.remove("node2"); list.printAll(); list.removeAt(2); list.printAll(); Output Initial List: node1 node2 node3 node4 List after removing node2 node1 node3 node4 List after removing node at index 2 node1 node3 Conclusion

Implementing a linked list in JavaScript involves creating a Node class to represent each node in the list and a LinkedList class to represent the list itself, and adding methods to the LinkedList class to perform operations such as adding and removing data, and printing the list. It’s important to also consider edge cases and handle them accordingly in your implementation. There are several ways of adding or removing data from a LinkedList based upon the use case.

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