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Robert Triggs / Android Authority

When it comes to spending top dollar, there’s premium and then there’s Sony Xperia 1 IV premium. Priced at a sky-high $1,600, Sony’s 2023 flagship was always a tough sell. It certainly didn’t help that the hardware package, while mostly solid, contained a few issues too.

Six months after its US release and now in the midst of 2023’s flagship season, can the handset still hold its own against the best smartphones? Well, for starters, a discount (if we can call it that) down to $1,199 makes the latest Xperia much more palatable, but what else? Let’s take a closer look in this Sony Xperia 1 IV review revisit.

Outstanding design

Robert Triggs / Android Authority

The look may not have changed much over the years, but Sony knows how to build great-looking and feeling smartphones. The Xperia 1 IV remains a stunner, with a metal chassis and matte finish encased in Gorilla Glass Victus on the front and back.

But you can find similar quality elsewhere, too; what really sets the Xperia apart are its design features. It’s one of the few remaining flagship phones sporting a 3.5mm headphone jack, complete with front-facing stereo speakers. There’s also a microSD card slot, another industry rarity, for up to 1TB of expandable storage if you own a mammoth media collection. The side-mounted fingerprint scanner is also wonderfully responsive and there’s a dedicated camera shutter button too to round things off.

As lanky as the phone is, the 21:9 aspect ratio has grown on me compared to wider handsets. It’s a little tall to use Sony’s stacked multitasking windows effectively, but reaching across the handset with a single hand is no problem at all. It fits slightly nicer in the pocket too. Sony continues to earn a thumbs up for aesthetic and ergonomic design.

Multimedia features galore

Robert Triggs / Android Authority

If you’re tempted by the thought of a flagship phone with a headphone jack, chances are you’ll also be thrilled with the range of additional multimedia features packed into the Xperia 1 IV. Sony has increasingly shifted focus toward content creators, expanding from imaging to videography and now music recording features. This takes the form of its dedicated Photo Pro, Video Pro, and new Music Pro apps.

The first two offer deep manual modes that go well beyond what you’ll find from virtually any other smartphone, whether that’s fine control over photo exposure or setting a dedicated lens for your video shoot. Music Pro is far less fleshed out; it’s little more than a multi-track recorder rather than a serious DAW. Sony’s “studio tuning” auto-enhancement subscription feature doesn’t seem worth the money or even that useful as a serious tool.

It’s a flagship, obviously

Robert Triggs / Android Authority

Outside the multimedia menagerie, the Xperia 1 IV is obviously a high-end piece of hardware. It’s fully equipped with 5G networking, but only on sub-6GHz bands outside of the US. Wi-Fi 6E is also onboard for blazing-fast data potential, providing you have a compatible home router.

There’s an IP65/68 rating, 4K OLED display, a massive 5,000mAh battery, an innovative variable focal length telephoto camera, 4K HDR video recording on all lenses, wireless charging, and Snapdragon Sound with aptX Adaptive or Sony’s LDAC for Bluetooth audio.

That original $1,600 asking price was obviously very steep, but Sony does pack in a lot of expensive tech and features.

The not so good

The Xperia blueprint hasn’t changed much over the years, and some wrinkles are starting to show.

Similarly, Sony’s version of Android 13, updated from Android 12, isn’t quite the refined package either. It looks a lot like Google’s version of Android, embued with many a Sony toggle and extra setting. It’s functional and has certainly improved since the launch version. For instance, Material You is now in place to match the color scheme to your wallpaper. But the Google and Sony app combo results in a mishmash of themes. Furthermore, we could do without the pre-installed bloat, which includes Amazon Shopping, Prime Video, Facebook, Netflix, TIDAL, LinkedIn, chúng tôi and YouTube Music.

Performance

Lack of long-term value

Robert Triggs / Android Authority

Sony has slashed the price of the Xperia 1 IV from an unfathomable $1,600 to a more competitive $1,199. That’s what you’d pay for a new Samsung Galaxy S23 Ultra, which, based on the hardware on offer, feels a bit closer to the right ballpark, provided you don’t care about the aforementioned aging or missing hardware features, such as sluggish charging and no UWB.

However, Samsung’s flagship is supported with up to four years of Android versions and five years of patches. Sony, by comparison, provides just two years of OS updates and three years of security updates. That’s closer to what we’d expect from a solid mid-range phone than something claiming to be top-of-the-line. With Android 13 now applied, there’s just one more OS update to come if you buy today, which highlights just how little longevity is on offer here.

Apple, Google, and Samsung are all miles ahead. New models from Chinese brands OnePlus and OPPO now also outclass Sony for update commitments, and often at lower price points too. Simply put, there are much better long-term investments to make the most out of your $1,200.

It’s frustrating because I really rate the feature parity across all three lenses, which includes eye-tracking autofocus, 20fps burst modes, and 4K HDR video recording. Paired with an innovative variable 85-125mm focal length zoom and powerful manual controls, there are features here you won’t find anywhere else. I just wish Sony would do more to fix the camera’s HDR inconsistencies and hit-and-miss color pallet. You shouldn’t have to boot up Lightroom to make mobile snaps look passable.

You shouldn’t have to boot up Lightroom to make the Xperia 1 IV’s snaps look passable. But when you do, they can look sublime.

Because of that, whenever we’ve put the Xperia 1 IV head-to-head with the best camera phones, the handset has fallen behind the pack. In part, because we’re looking at results straight off the camera’s “basic” mode, no editing allowed. Case in point, you voted the Xperia 1 IV dead last, behind the Apple iPhone 14 Pro Max, Google Pixel 7 Pro, and Samsung Galaxy S22 Ultra, at the end of 2023. It’s hard to disagree with that assessment, based on the images below.

Having spent a lot of time with Sony’s handsets over the past few years, the cameras aren’t consistent enough for daily use. Only the most persistent editors will find them enjoyable, but the best smartphones should excel at point-and-shoot too.

Six months later: Do you think the Sony Xperia 1 IV is still a good buy?

972 votes

Sony seems to be OK with that, as are Xperia fans. But that’s all a bit of a shame because the Xperia 1 IV has a lot of really great ideas that more consumers should be in a position to enjoy. I don’t want the Xperia 1 series to lose its unique identity and excellent features, but it needs to find a way to cut through a little closer to the center ground. Unfortunately, a sky-high price tag and pursuit of the niche at the expense of familiarity are running the latest Xperia down a completely different track.

Sony Xperia 1 IV

Sony Xperia 1 IV

4K display • Unique content creator apps • Stellar video capture

MSRP: £1,299.00

A Sony flagship aimed at content creators

The Sony Xperia 1 IV matches a large 4K 120Hz display with a camera that can shoot the same. A high-end phone with high-end specs, and it even has a headphone jack!

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$200.00

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Google Pixel 5A Revisited: The Good And The Bad A Year Later

The good

We awarded the Google Pixel 5a 4.5/5 stars and it holds Recommended status in our official review. At the time, we noted that the phone was a great and unassuming phone that just worked without costing a fortune. On the flip side, we also felt its processor and cameras were starting to age even at release. A year later, most of these points remain unchanged.

Battery life

When we first reviewed the Pixel 5a we immediately fell in love with the massive battery. Our reviewer found he could easily get up to two days of use without needing to charge the phone up. A year later, my experiences are pretty similar.

What makes the Pixel 5a’s battery life so fantastic is twofold. First, the 4,680mAh battery is bigger than most reasonably-sized flagships out there, including the Pixel 6 with its 4,614mAh battery. The second reason is that the mid-tier processor and 1080p display aren’t exactly battery-guzzlers. The combination means you really have a phone that never runs out of juice unless you’re trying to.

If I really try to push the phone with more intensive apps like mobile games and streaming, sure, the battery might drop down faster. Even so, I found the days I pushed it to its max still saw nearly a day and a half’s use on just one charge. When I took it easier, pushing to two days (or even slightly over that) wasn’t too hard to reach either.

Most of the time I found myself not charging at night anymore at all, as the battery lifespan was so good it felt unnecessary. Instead, I’d just plug it in for an hour or so each day while working.

Prefer phones with big batteries? Check out our guide to the phones with the best battery life

Google’s software might not be flashy, but the additions it does add are often truly useful.

The Pixel 5a promised at least three years of OS and security updates, though it’s now a third of the way through that guarantee. It’s not as good as the three-year OS and five-year security pledge you’d find with the Pixel 6, though. The big question is how well has Google kept its promise? Pretty well actually. It’s constantly attempted to squash bugs over the last year. Early on, many users reported issues like overheating and app crashing, and mostly, that doesn’t seem to be an issue for me at all here in 2023.

The OS side of things has also been handled well. The Pixel 5a shipped with Android 11, but mine is fully updated to Android 12. Android 13 beta is also fully supported by the Pixel 5a, which should mean the latest version of Android will hit the handset relatively shortly after its official release.

There’s little to complain about when it comes to the Pixel 5a’s software or its update schedule, though it’s important to note that Samsung actually beats Google here. Earlier this year Samsung started offering up to four years of OS updates and five years of security patches for select phones, including several devices that compete with the Pixel 5a on price. If long-term support matters to you, Google is still pretty solid but Samsung has really upped the competition.

Camera

Okay, the Pixel 5a camera is using a pretty old sensor. Aside from some minor tweaks, the camera used here is the same one as the Pixel 3 series. I can also honestly say pictures from the Pixel 6 series’ upgraded camera suite look better to my eyes, but we have to remember something here: this is a budget phone. It’s hard to find a much better camera at this price.

If you’re a true photography nut, you’ll find that the camera isn’t as good as you’ll find with a flagship. But let’s be honest, most of us just want quick snaps of our food, kids, family, and friends so we can share them on social media. The Pixel 5a excels at those basics, with accurate colors and above-average exposure levels. It also has a fairly wide dynamic range.

The Pixel 5a has a 16MP ultrawide lens with a 107-degree field of view. Pixel 5a photos will come out great almost every time in the daylight, but even night shots manage to hold up pretty well thanks to Google’s Night Sight mode. Really, the only situation where the Pixel 5a’s camera doesn’t perform like a more modern flagship is when zooming in. The 12MP sensor and lack of a telephoto are recipes for disaster at anything beyond 2x, and even then the images just come out kind of blurry. Google’s Super Res Zoom technology is good but it can’t work miracles.

Check out: The best camera phones

For those that love taking selfies, you’ll find the 8MP front-facing sensor does the job just fine. I didn’t really have much to report, though our original reviewer noted that Google’s software can struggle with blurring out hair or the edges of glasses, but that’s usually the case for portrait shots. I didn’t notice it, but to be honest I also didn’t take tons of selfies during my time with the phone.

Yes, the Pixel 6a has a better camera on paper due to it borrowing the Pixel 6’s ultrawide shooter (we’ve yet to fully test it), but the main camera is unchanged as far as hardware goes. It’s no surprise then that the 5a still holds up just fine in 2023 and is still one of the best in the mid-range market. It’s also one of the more stable and consistent camera experiences. Its camera app opens much faster than most other budget phones and 90% of the time, the photos you take are going to look great, even if the lighting isn’t perfect. That’s certainly more than many other budget devices can say.

The not so good

The Google Pixel 5a is intended as a phone for basic users and so obviously not everything about it is going to be perfect. Compared to other mid-rangers, it’s a bit expensive for starters. Aside from price, there are a few other downsides worthy of discussion.

Its fast charging isn’t particularly fast

Jimmy Westenberg / Android Authority

Earlier, we applauded the Pixel 5a for excellent battery life, but big batteries come at a cost. The 4,680mAh battery takes over two hours to charge from zero to 100% with the supplied 18W charger. This is much slower than not only today’s flagships, but several budget options like the Galaxy A53 5G edge it out at least a little too.

Should you care about this at all? In my experience, no, as the excellent battery life makes it less of a concern. But it’s important to remember that if you use this phone all the way to near depletion, charging it won’t be a fast affair. Then again, if you plug in every night, you’ll never even notice this as a major issue.

Price/Value

When the Pixel 5a launched last year, I’d say it was a pretty excellent value since it was priced about $150 less than the Pixel 5. But then the Pixel 6 came out and you could easily buy the Pixel 5 second-hand for much less than the 5a. We also saw more mid-range competitors offering aggressive price tags over the last year.

Currently in mid-2024, the Pixel 5a’s most obvious competitor is actually the Pixel 6a ($449). The newly upgraded phone is priced the exact same but has quite a few improvements. Then we have the Galaxy A53 5G ($449) which is priced the same and in some ways is actually a better phone than the 5a. The A53 5G has a 120Hz display, a longer software support guarantee, and a slightly larger battery (though actual performance is about the same). You also get 25W charging over 18W. If you care about these things, the A53 5G is really tempting. If cameras matter more to you, the Pixel 5a is still the better option.

Google Pixel 5a review revisited: The verdict

When I first started using the Pixel 5a I could really tell the difference from my more expensive Pixel 6, but then I started to slowly forget I was even using a different phone. In most situations, the speeds were similar for day-to-day use, and the size and weight aren’t too different either. That’s a pretty big compliment for a phone that costs $150 less new and can be found even cheaper online at places like eBay and Swappa.

Next: Google Pixel 5a problems and how to fix them

Google Pixel 5a

Google Pixel 5a

Killer battery life • Versatile cameras • Three years of updates

MSRP: $389.99

A budget phone with great cameras

The Pixel 5a takes the winning formula of the Pixel 4a 5G, adds a metal build and water resistance, and drops the price a bit. It’s an affordable phone from Google with an impressive camera system and a great software experience.

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$46.99

Sony Xperia Z5 Premium Review

Our Verdict

A 4K smartphone might seem like something you want but you really don’t need it and it’s an expensive card to play in order to trump your mates. The device is also big, uncomfortable and brash. Hardware is the same as the regular Z5 so it really comes down to the screen, which doesn’t even display 4K much of the time. We strongly recommend steering clear of the Premium which is this year’s most unnecessary phone and sticking to the regular Z5 or one its alternatives.

One of the surprise announcements of IFA 2024, back in September, was Sony’s Xperia Z5 Premium which is the first 4K smartphone to make the light of day. After some proper time with the new phone, here’s our full and in-depth Sony Xperia Z5 Premium review.

Also see: Best Black Friday Phone Deals

Also announced at IFA 2024 by Sony was the Sony Xperia Z5 and the Sony Xperia Z5 Compact. Sony faces tough competition in the smartphone market and the unique selling point of the Premium is something which it helps will differentiate it from rivals such as Apple and Samsung.

Sony Xperia Z5 Premium review: Price and competition

As you might expect from the world’s first 4K phone, the price of the Xperia Z5 Premium lives up to its name. Sony’s official price for the handset is a whopping £629. This makes it one of the most expensive phones on the market along with the iPhone 6S Plus which costs up to £789 and the Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge+ which can set you back up to £719 – the Z5 Premium doesn’t even include headphones either.

You’re better off buying the Xperia Z5 Premium elsewhere as Clove is selling it for £600 with free accessories while Amazon has it for a fairly reasonable £576.

Sony Xperia Z5 Premium review: Design and build

This is the most recognisable of the Z5 range with since it’s the largest of the three and, oh yeah, it’s shiny mirrored finish. The device will be available in Chrome, Gold and Black options and we took a look at the very bling Chrome option. Also see: Best MiFi 2024.

It might make the device look fancy and you can check your makeup or do your hair my looking in the back, but you’ll be forever polishing it to get rid of fingerprint marks and smudges which appear the first time you pick it up.

Things go from gleaming to grubby in a matter of seconds so we prefer the frosted glass of the other Z5 phones.

If you can bear owning a phone this shiny then the Z5 Premium has the same design features as its smaller counterparts. This means its waterproof with only a flap to cover the slot which houses the SIM-card and Micro-SD card slot.

It also means the Z5 has a new power button so the iconic round one is gone and has been replaced with a flat rectangle. Sounds a bit boring but it’s because it now has a fingerprint scanner built-in. We’ve tried it out and it’s fast, accurate and is placed on the phone better than any other we’ve seen exactly where your thumb naturally lies.

At 7.8mm, the Premium is a little thicker than the regular Xperia Z5 but it’s not that which we’re worried about. The phone weighs 180g which is pretty colossal and more than other phones with the same screen size – even the brick-like OnePlus 2 is lighter at 175g so this is a serious drawback of the Z5 Premium.

We can understand why Sony has kept the same rectangular shape for the Premium to match the other Z5 phones, but at this size it makes for a rather uncomfortable and unwieldy experience.

A smaller problem is that the volume rocker is situated below the power button which makes it pretty awkward to use. That’s the same as previous Xperia handsets but it’s lower down this time around.

As usual, one of the key selling points is that the Z5 Premium is dust- and waterproof to an IP68 rating which is great to see. There is only one flap, too, making life a lot easier.

Sony Xperia Z5 Premium review: All about the 4K screen and content

Let’s jump straight into the most exciting section of the Xperia Z5 Premium’s spec sheet which is that 4K screen. Sony has skipped Quad HD entirely and is the first manufacturer to bring us a resolution on a phone which most people don’t even have on their TV or computer monitor yet.

That’s right, the Xperia Z5 Premium offers a 2160×3840 resolution on a 5.5in, meaning a jaw dropping pixel density of 806ppi. That beats the Galaxy S6 by a long way which has touts 577ppi.

Sure this phone has some serious top trump credentials in this department and people at the pub might not even believe that it’s Ultra HD but the numbers on the spec sheet make up a very small part of the full picture here.

In comparison with the regular Xperia Z5, the premium model doesn’t have as much brightness available and colours are slightly less punchy – the latter is more a personal thing and I actually prefer it a bit more laid back.

There’s a good reason for this and you can probably guess what it is. Driving all those pixels 100 percent of time would result in a serious dip in both performance and battery life. The other reason is that Android 5.1 Lollipop doesn’t support 4K resolution.

The latest, 6.0 Marshmallow, does and an update is coming but even then it’s designed for up to 640ppi which Google describes as ‘extra-extra-extra-high density’ which is a fair way off the Premium’s 806ppi. When the update does arrive, we doubt Sony will simply remove the downscaling.

So when exactly do you get 4K on the only 4K phone around? Well not often; you need to open Sony’s own Album, and Video apps which will display content in the full resolution. This means you’re most likely to see 4K when viewing photos and videos you’ve captured with the phone. Third party services such as Netflix and YouTube have 4K content but this isn’t what you’ll get on the phone.

Our conclusion on the 4K screen of the Xperia Z5 Premium is that thing can look great on it with excellent amounts of detail. However, it’s extremely limited and really not that different compared to Quad HD phones.

At the moment, 4K on a phone is simply a mismatch and we think the need to downscale proves this.

Sony Xperia Z5 Premium review: Other hardware and specs

So is there anything else other than the 4K screen to tempt you to buy the Premium model over the other Z5 phones on the hardware side?

Well not really, the Xperia Z5 Premium also has a Qualcomm Snapdragon 810 processor, 3GB of RAM, 32GB internal storage and a Micro-SD card slot for adding up to 200GB more which is the same line-up as the regular Z5 – the Compact is only different with 2GB of RAM.

As you can see below the phone benchmarked almost identical numbers to the regular Z5 due to the downscaling of the resolution. We’ve found the phone to be smooth and responsive in use.

The battery is larger, since there’s more space for it, but battery life is similar to the Z5. The 3430mAh capacity provided five hours and 49 minutes with a score of 3491 in our Geekbench 3 test. Not a bad result but still two or three hours behind the leaders.

As you would expect from a phone which costs over £600, you get a lot of the latest tech on-board. The Z5 Premium features dual-band 11ac Wi-Fi, Bluetooth 4.1 with aptX, NFC, GPS and support for 4G LTE networks.

Sony has opted against a Type-C reversible USB port for now but that’s not the end of the world at the moment. The Micro-USB port is at least waterproof without a flap but we’d like to see wireless charging included for such a high-end phone.

Like the other Z5 phones, a big addition is the fingerprint scanner. But we don’t mean in size as it’s somehow squeezed into the power button on the size. The scanner is quick and accurate and has the best placement on the device we’ve experienced. It’s even easy to use with the Z5 Premium on a flat surface without picking it up.

It’s also got the same camera which is a new 23Mp sensor with some improvements too such as faster auto focus (just 0.03 seconds according to Sony), x5 digital zoom without a loss of quality and the best low light performance.

We love that Sony has kept the physical two-stage camera button which makes photography that bit easier and feels more professional. The focus is amazingly fast and is easily one of the quickest we’ve seen helping you shoot more freely.

Be default the camera shoots at 8Mp, not the full 23Mp, so that the extra pixels can be used for oversampling. We’re not convinced by the Clear Image Zoom feature and while low light performance is good, the lack of optical stabilisation is a big omission here and something we’d expect Sony to offer.

The camera is very good but just not as good as Sony makes out. At the front is a 5Mp camera which is about as good as you might expect – good but nothing out of the ordinary.

Sony Xperia Z5 Premium review: Software

There are new Nexus phones running Android 6.0 Marshmallow now but the Z5 Premium comes pre-loaded with version 5.1 Lollipop. As mentioned earlier, an upgrade will come but we can only review it like it is now.

Sony hasn’t really done much on the software side so it’s really about the design and hardware here. Previous users, and even those coming from a different Android manufacturer will feel at home.

As with previous Xperia phones the user interface is fairly vanilla so Sony has decided to use the stock Android Lollipop notification bar and recent apps menu. But it does add all the Sony style like normal including wallpapers, widgets, floating apps and own-brand apps like Walkman and PlayStation.

All the Sony Xperia Z5 phones come with Xperia Lounge Gold access but they come pre-loaded with some third party apps like OfficeSuite, AVG, Dropbox and Facebook. These do take up space and we’d rather choose what to install but Sony does allow you to uninstall them so it’s not so bad.

Specs Sony Xperia Z5 Premium: Specs

Android 5.1 Lollipop

5.5in 4K IPS (2160×3840, 806ppi)

2.2GHz Quad-Core Qualcomm Snapdragon 810 CPU

Adreno 430 GPU

3GB RAM

32GB internal storage

microSD slot (up to 200GB)

23Mp rear camera AF with LED Flash

5Mp front camera

Video recording at up to 2160p

Wi-Fi up tp chúng tôi LTE Cat 6

Nano-SIM

3430mAh battery

Dust and waterproof (IP68)

76x154x7.8mm

180g

Bullying And Students With Disabilities: The Ugly, The Bad, And The Good

October is National Bullying Prevention Month, and it is important to discuss how educators can create classrooms of tolerance and empathy, fully inclusive of the students with disabilities. In the spirit of the good, the bad, and the ugly, let’s discuss the laws around bullying, the potential civil rights violations, and the legal risks involved with bullying students with documented disabilities. Then we’ll move onto preventative measures and how we can create an inclusive and self-governing classroom in which students set the tone for kindness and inclusion. 

The Bad and the Ugly 

Unlike some forms of bullying, bullying students with a documented disability can result in enormous legal consequences and financial liability for the school district involved. It is important to remember that bullying and harassing a student in a “protected class”, such as race, national original, religion, sex, and disability, is not only detrimental but a violation of the student’s civil rights. There are several laws in place to protect students with disabilities and as the protector of these students, please do your homework and comply.  

I have worked and consulted on several egregious cases in local school districts.  In most of the cases, a well-intentioned teacher became overwhelmed and let it affect his/her judgment.  If you feel this overwhelm coming on, call an administrator or make a deal with a colleague, don’t let stress turn into unintentional bullying. 

The Good (and the How to Incorporate It)

My hope is that the following tips will allow you to create a climate of tolerance and inclusion and to minimize stress so that the onus of preventing bullying doesn’t fall on you and you alone. 

1. Stop the Harrumph

Students are wonderfully perceptive. Students with disabilities grow up with the idea that they are always a “problem” or a total inconvenience. In fact, I often work with university students unwilling to ask for accommodation because of one bad experience or one teacher expressing their unwillingness or reluctance to accommodate. Allow the IEP to serve as a guide on how to specifically accommodate one student and generally accommodate all students. 

2. Teach Self-Advocacy

Why would you want this challenge? Because if students are comfortable confronting you, they will be comfortable confronting a potential bully.

3. Create a Culture of Respect and Tolerance

Many articles on Edutopia speak of how teachers can create this culture in the classroom, however a favorite practice to prevent bullying is to allow students to set the normatives and the Constitution of the classroom and set up mechanisms for enforcement. 

4. Share Your Experiences

Talk about you own experiences with difference, its direct relationship with bullying, and who made the difference in your life. As a teacher and occasional speaker, I talk of my own difference, that I am a woman with a disability, the invisible disability of lupus. I speak about how I have had experienced stigmatization in my academic journey and the importance of having a voice and allies. 

Think about the times you have experienced bullying because of something you cannot change and be the first one to be vulnerable in the classroom. In order to create a classroom where difference is discussed, explored and valued, use your own vulnerability to allow others to share.

5. Empower Bystanders

Peers stop at least 50 percent of bullying. Let that sink in! Wow. We rarely discuss the importance of empowering non-disabled heteronormative peers, yet without this embedded into pedagogy, students stop a lot of bullying. What if we could make this 80 percent?

Talk about the importance of being a Good Samaritan, why it is important to use your voice for the voiceless, and great subject matter centric examples of people who would be more comfortable remaining silent but instead courageously spoke out against oppression. 

As someone who has worked in this intersection for a long time, it will be a welcome shift when bullies are shut down by an empowered majority as opposed to a given tacit approval by scared and uniformed peers. 

Sony Ericsson Xperia Mini And Mini Pro Get Official

Sony Ericsson XPERIA mini and mini pro get official

Sony Ericsson has announced the XPERIA mini and the mini pro, apparently the smallest HD smartphones in the world. The Android 2.3 Gingerbread handsets can shoot 720p HD video, and use Sony’s BRAVIA engine along with Sony Ericsson’s custom UI. The XPERIA mini is touch-only, but the mini pro has a slide-out QWERTY keyboard.

Behind the 3-inch 320 x 480 scratch-resistant touchscreen there’s a 1GHz Qualcomm Snapdragon processor, 320MB of storage and a microSD card slot (a 2GB card will be included). There’s also quadband GSM/EDGE, UMTS/HSDPA, WiFi, AGPS, Bluetooth, an FM radio and a 3.5mm headphones socket. On the back is a 5-megapixel camera with autofocus, face-detection and an LED flash. A bigger, 1200mAh battery than the last-gen mini adds up to 30-percent longer runtimes.

The four shortcut corners of the original X10 mini have been retained, but each now acts as a shortcut area for four icons, in what Sony Ericsson is calling 4×4. That, along with auto-correction on both devices, adds up to what the company reckons is the performance and usability of larger Android phones, but in a very pocket-friendly form factor.

The Sony Ericsson XPERIA mini will go on sale in August 2011 in a choice of white, black, blue and dark pink. The XPERIA mini pro, meanwhile, will drop at the same time in white, black, pink and turquoise. Pricing is yet to be confirmed, but we already know Vodafone UK will be ranging the mini pro.

Press Release:

Sony Ericsson unveils next-generation XPERIA minis

05 May 2011

Introducing two powerful, versatile and compact smartphones

Xperia™ mini – the world’s smallest HD video recording smartphone

Xperia™ mini pro –intuitive fast messaging in a compact smartphone

May 5th, 2011, London – Sony Ericsson unveils the new Xperia™ mini and Xperia™ mini pro, the latest additions to its Xperia™ family. Building on the success of the original mini series, these innovative smartphones come packed full of features, powered by a 1GHz Qualcomm Snapdragon™ processor, and run the latest platform of Google’s Android™ – Gingerbread 2.3. Beautifully designed, Xperia™ mini and Xperia™ mini pro both integrate best-in-class imaging and display technology from Sony, including Reality Display with Mobile BRAVIA Engine and HD video recording (720p).

The products offer a full multimedia entertainment experience. Xperia™ mini and Xperia™ mini pro enable access to over 150,000 apps on the Android Market™ and has a 3″ scratch-resistant, multi-touch glass screen. The improved user interface allows up to 16 apps displayed on the home screen. Facebook inside Xperia™, a feature just announced for the Xperia™ family, provides a unique social media integration.

Xperia™ mini pro brings the optimized slide-out keyboard with smart functionality first seen on the Xperia™ pro to a compact smartphone. A subtle but fast Type & Send functionality eliminates the need to open a dedicated app for each type of message, and Smart Keyboard triggers predictive messaging actions automatically when the user slides out the keyboard. Xperia™ mini pro also comes pre-loaded with Office Suite and McAfee antivirus software, letting consumers manage documents and e-mails instantly and securely while on the move.

Steve Walker, Head of Marketing, Sony Ericsson said, “We wanted to provide consumers even greater choice across the Xperia™ range, while building on the success of the original mini series. These turbo-charged smartphones now contain even more power, enhanced functionality, a larger screen and premium features unique to Sony Ericsson. They are packed full of features, making them a perfect choice for consumers looking for all the benefits of Android and Sony in a beautiful and easy to use compact form factor.”

Sony Ericsson Xperia™ mini – Key features

World’s smallest Android™ smartphone with HD video recording

Reality Display with Mobile BRAVIA® Engine

Place up to 16 apps in the corners of your home screen

Over 150,000 apps on Android Market™

Facebook inside. Keeping your friends closer

Sony Ericsson Xperia™ mini pro – Key features

Ergonomic keyboard and smart functions for fast messaging

HD video and Reality Display with Mobile BRAVIA® Engine

Synch your email and view office documents safely on the go

Place up to 16 apps in the corners of your home screen

Over 150,000 apps on Android Market™

Sony Ericsson Xperia™ mini pro and Xperia™ mini with HD will be available globally in selected markets from Q3.

Sony Xperia Sp Cm13 Brings Marshmallow Update Unofficially

Sony Xperia SP won’t get a Marshmallow update from the company now that it is pretty old to receive the Android 6.0. And that’s why you will have to rely on custom ROMs as such to get the update unofficially. This is where CM13 ROM comes into play, a popular ROM that’s raining Marshmallow updates on many devices these days.

Recently we covered CM13 for Xperia SP, Moto E 1st Gen, and a very old device in Galaxy Tab 7.7. It’s one super cool thing about Android that you can still receive major updates as custom ROMs when OEM has long abandoned the device.

Read: Galaxy Grand 2 Marshmallow Update via CM13

If you own an Xperia SP and want to install Marshmallow update, then CM13 remains your best choice right now. The ROM is pretty good, too. It’s got some bugs as it’s under development right now, but you could find it good enough for trying out 6.0 update.

This ROM requires that your device has bootloader unlocked, which is our step 1 below too. Also, you are going to need a custom recovery like TWRP, which is out step 2 below.

Note: Check the source page here (by Mrcl1450) for details and download link of latest release. As the ROM is under heavy development and new features are added and bugs ironed out, we recommend you check out the details to know current bugs and become fully aware of what’s working and what’snot, before installing the ROM.

Supported devices

Sony Xperia SP, codename huashan

Don’t try this on any device whose codename is not same as the one specified above.

→ Use the Droid Info app to determine the codename of your device. If it is exactly the one specified above, then it should be compatible with the 6.0 custom ROM we have here.

Warning!

Warranty may be void of your device if you follow the procedures given on this page. You only are responsible for your device. We won’t be liable if any damage occurs to your device and/or its components.

Backup!

Backup important files stored on your device before proceeding with the steps below, so that in case something goes wrong you’ll have backup of all your important files.

How to Install

Step 1. Make sure that you have unlocked bootloader of your Xperia SP. If not, then do that first.

Step 2. Also make sure that you have installed a custom recovery like TWRP on your device. TWRP recovery is required to be able to install CM13 ROM.

Step 3. Download the CM13 ROM and gapps file from above.

Step 2. Connect your device to PC and transfer the ROM and gapps file to it. Disconnect the device then. Remember the location of the files.

Step 3. Boot your Xperia SP into recovery mode. If you are rooted, you can use Quick Boot app from play store. To manually boot into recovery mode, do this:

Power off the device. Wait for 4-5 seconds after screen goes off.

Now, power on the device using power button and then be sure to press the volume up or down key repeatedly once you see LED light blinking on the device.

You will enter recovery mode soon, and should see TWRP recovery. If you see android with exclamation mark, or 3e recovery, then you need to install TWRP recovery for this.

Step 4. [Optional] Once in TWRP, create a backup of your device. Tap on Backup, and then select all the partitions for back. Now do the swipe action at bottom to start creating a backup for emergency cases. This backup is really a lifesaver!

Step 6. Now, install the ROM file. On TWRP’s homescreen, tap on Install, and then locate the ROM file and tap on it. Then do the Swipe action at bottom to begin flashing the update.

Step 7. Tap on Home button to go back. Now, install the Gapps the same way you installed Marshmallow ROM on your Xperia SP.

Step 8. When it’s done, tap on Reboot system button to restart the device.

That’s it.

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