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Since Google launched the Google+ social network as an invitation-only service, Facebook has announced and shipped a series of bold new features.

Some are clearly designed to copy or match Google services, others to exceed it and enable Facebook to do things Google can’t do.

When first unveiled, these features often sound full of promise.

But then, again and again, the features fail. Users ignore them. Everybody forgets about them. And they kind of fade away into oblivion.

Why do Facebook’s new features seem to go nowhere?

In July, 2011, Facebook announced the integration of Microsoft’s popular Skype video-capable VoIP service. The move was a great response to Google’s popular Hangouts video service, which supports video calls and phone calls with up to ten users simultaneously.

Few used it. In fact, I would be surprised if a majority of Facebook users are even aware that it ever existed.

In September of 2011, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg announced a breathtaking range of content-related partnerships that was to transform the social network into a “primary entertainment hub,” according to The New York Times.

Users could now discover, play and share music from Spotify, MOG, Rdio, Rhapsody, chúng tôi VEVO, Slacker, Songza, TuneIn, iheartradio, Deezer, Earbits, Jelli, and Mixcloud from within their News Feeds—not to mention TV and movies from Netflix, Hulu, Blockbuster, IMDB, Dailymotion and Flixter and news content from The Wall Street Journal, the Washington Post, Slate, the Associated Press, Reuters, Yahoo News and others.

But The Times was wrong: Facebook as a “primary entertainment hub” never happened. The revolution in social entertainment on Facebook was forgotten.

Facebook also announced its Timeline interface in September of 2011. Some users loved it; others groused. But Facebook didn’t give users a chance to ignore it. The company allowed users to upgrade to the new interface until earlier this year when they flipped a switch and made Timeline the interface for everybody.

I believe the Timeline was one of Facebook’s successes. They should have simply replaced the old interface with Timeline for everybody right away, and saved themselves from a lot of bad press.

In general, Facebook is a lot more appealing with the Timeline and, of course, everybody uses it.

Facebook launched its Poke app in December of 2012. Poke sends messages that can expire after 1, 3, 5 or 10 seconds depending on the sender’s choice.

The app was reportedly created in less than two weeks in response to the wildly popular Snapchat app, which enables users to create pictures, videos and now texts and drawings and send them to friends’ phones where they’ll auto-delete in 10 seconds.

It appears, however, that Poke is having no impact. User data suggests a tiny bump when Poke first launched, followed by a reduction in users.

For example, from December to January, usage on iOS appears to have dropped from just under 2 percent of iPhone users to less than 1 percent. Snapchat, on the other hand, is experiencing strong user growth.

Facebook announced in January that users could listen to the same song at the same time via the chat feature.

As with many Facebook features, almost nobody uses this, but the reason is clear: Both users must be on the same music service and want to sit there on Facebook listening to a song at the same time as someone else. It’s a minority of a minority.

I have no idea whether Facebook’s Suggested Posts “feature,” added in October of 2012, is a business success or failure for Facebook. But I do hear a lot of users complaining about it.

First, “Suggested Posts” are right there on the timeline, as big as a regular post.

The third problem with “Suggested Posts” is that the name is a lie. Nobody is suggesting the post. It’s an ad labeled in a way to fool users into thinking a friend “suggested” it.

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Why Do Hackers Target The Cryptocurrencies?

Some of the reasons why hackers target cryptocurrencies are gathered in this article

Cryptocurrencies are digital assets that use cryptography to secure transactions and control the creation of new units. They operate on decentralized networks called blockchains, which are distributed ledgers that record and verify transactions without the need for intermediaries. Cryptocurrencies offer many benefits, such as transparency, anonymity, low fees, and global accessibility. However, these benefits also come with risks and challenges, especially in terms of security. Cryptocurrencies have become a target for hackers, who employ various methods and techniques to steal funds, disrupt services, and exploit weaknesses in blockchain technology. Some of the reasons why hackers target cryptocurrencies are:

Cryptocurrencies have High Value and Volatility: The cryptocurrency market is worth over $2 trillion as of March 2023, with Bitcoin being the most dominant coin with a market cap of over $1 trillion. The prices of cryptocurrencies fluctuate significantly, creating opportunities for arbitrage and speculation. Hackers can profit from these price movements by manipulating the market, such as by creating fake transactions, inflating volumes, or triggering flash crashes. Hackers can also steal cryptocurrencies directly from exchanges, wallets, or users, and convert them into fiat currency or other assets through various platforms and services.

Cryptocurrencies have Weak Regulation and Oversight: Unlike traditional financial systems, cryptocurrencies operate outside the control and supervision of governments and central authorities. This means that there are no clear rules or standards for securing and auditing cryptocurrency transactions and platforms. Moreover, there are no legal protections or guarantees for cryptocurrency users and investors in case of theft, fraud, or loss. Hackers can exploit this lack of regulation and oversight by launching attacks from jurisdictions that have lax or non-existent laws on cybercrime and money laundering. Hackers can also evade detection and prosecution by using anonymizing tools and techniques, such as VPNs, Tor, or mixers.

Cryptocurrencies have Technical Vulnerabilities and Limitations: The blockchain technology that underpins cryptocurrencies is not flawless or immune to attacks. Blockchain networks rely on consensus mechanisms, such as proof-of-work or proof-of-stake, to validate transactions and maintain security. However, these mechanisms can be compromised or disrupted by hackers who have enough computing power or stake to influence or override the network’s decisions. For example, hackers can perform a 51% attack, where they control more than half of the network’s hashing power or stake, and can reverse or double-spend transactions. Hackers can also exploit bugs or flaws in the code or design of cryptocurrencies or their supporting software, such as wallets, smart contracts, or bridges.

The impact of these attacks on the cryptocurrency industry and the wider digital economy is significant and multifaceted. On one hand, these attacks erode the trust and confidence of cryptocurrency users and investors, who may lose their funds or face legal consequences for their involvement in illicit activities. On the other hand, these attacks also spur innovation and improvement in the cryptocurrency space, as developers and stakeholders work to enhance security measures and standards, adopt best practices and guidelines, and collaborate with regulators and law enforcement agencies to combat cybercrime.

Don’t Do This On Facebook: A Guide For Marketers

Are you planning to market your brand on Facebook? You better follow the rules, or you’ll be out, and you’ll be out fast.

A robust social platform for business marketing, Facebook is one of the monsters of the social media realm.

With a considerable amount of users of all ages, all of whom have varied interests, it’s easy to find your niche target audience. But you better not mess up.

Facebook is proud of their community standards and the action they are willing to take.

For instance, the platform has a strong stance against hate speech – throughout Q3 of 2023, they took action on 22.1M pieces of hate speech content.

Yes, you want to stay on their good side. You also want to ensure your Facebook marketing works to drive sales.

However, there’s no need to worry. As long as you follow my guide with a few simple rules for marketing on Facebook, you’ll be good to go.

Facebook Is Vital For Marketers

You want to stay on Facebook – marketing on the social media platform is crucial.

Why? Because Facebook is, without a doubt, a ringleader when it comes to social media.

Based on statistics from 2023, Facebook reaches 59% of social media users. That’s over half of the population on social media.

You Need A Guide To Facebook These Days

Although Facebook can help you see great success if you approach it correctly, not doing so could result in quick failure.

In this article, I’ve compiled a list of unacceptable errors you could run into on Facebook and what to do instead.

The 5 Worst Things You Can Do On Facebook

It’s simple to slip up, especially if you’re new to Facebook.

Are you worried about messing up? I’m here to help put your mind at ease – here’s what not to do on Facebook.

Avoid these missteps, and you’ll be well on your way to a prosperous Facebook marketing campaign.

1. Overpost Or Overshare

First of all, overposting or sharing content is going to be annoying to your audience. While you want to post on a regular schedule, you can’t make it seem like spam. Facebook also hates spam.

Generally, post to Facebook no more than one to two times per day, maybe a few more depending on your business. Anything excessive could be seen as spam, however, which could get your account disabled.

Be especially careful of bulk posts that contain promotional messaging – Facebook automatically considers this spam.

2. Try To Promote Your Business Without Paying

Facebook has also banned any promotional cover art. A.k.a., cover art that features a sales flyer or CTA (Call to Action) within the picture.

A CTA could include a request for users to go to the company’s website, make a purchase, or download the company’s app. Facebook gives you CTA buttons within your page now anyway, so there’s no point in adding one to your cover art as well.

Here’s a look at the CTA buttons:

3. Have Too Broad An Audience

Here, we’ve come to what some endearingly call “lazy targeting.” Although you may not get in trouble with Facebook over it, lazy targeting can be an effortless way to tank your marketing strategy goals.

What I’m talking about is not putting enough effort into determining your ideal target audience. Facebook gives you some fantastic tools to narrow down to the specific audience you’re trying to reach — you’re shooting yourself in the foot if you don’t use them.

Whether you realize it or not yet, your company has a niche: your marketing strategy should focus on it.

Not doing so will result in many views from bored users who have little to no interest in your brand simply because they’re nowhere near to being your target audience.

Spend time researching your target audience: what they like, what they do, and how they act.

Honing in on specific economic factors, interests, and activities of your audience will help you reach only the people who are likely to interact with you, like Intrepid Travel does.

4. Post Bad Images Or Content

When I say don’t post bad images or content, I mean two things:

Don’t Post Low-quality Photos

This is a great way to make your company look unprofessional. If you post grainy, unclear photos, it will lower your page’s image.

Facebook pages that either post low-quality visuals or use them in their profile are likely to be disregarded.

Make Sure Your Content Is Appropriate

Facebook has taken a tough stance on the content it considers appropriate – it is vital to ensure you’re following their community standards. Not only will you ensure your page doesn’t stay up if you violate them, but it will also paint your business in a bad light.

Facebook won’t tolerate content that contains:

Hate speech.

Violent or graphic content.

Child nudity or sexual exploitation.

Bullying or harassment.

It’s pretty straightforward: just don’t break the laid-out rules and post pretty content.

Intrepid Travel does an excellent job at increasing engagement by posting captivating images from around the world – it’s no surprise they have over half of a million followers.

5. Incorrectly Used CTA

The most important thing to note here is to make your CTA crystal clear.

It must always, plainly and clearly, state where it will lead and the actions the user will be expected to take. If you don’t follow that rule, Facebook will take action against your account.

Don’t overuse your CTA, either. A tip to help keep your audience from getting overwhelmed: it’s key not to try and do too many things simultaneously.

While Facebook gives you up to seven CTA buttons on your Facebook page, that doesn’t mean you should use every single one.

Finally, make sure you do use a CTA or two. It’s essential to do it correctly but failing to use any type of CTA at all is worse than a bad one. It means potential consumers have nowhere to go once they’ve found you.

What To Do Instead

I’ve talked a lot about what not to do on Facebook. But what should you do instead? The answers make sense when you think about it.

If you’re looking to completely revamp and need even more tips on creating the best Facebook page for your business, we’ve written about it before.

Maintain A Regular Schedule

Instead of posting sporadically, or on the other hand, posting so much it looks like spam, follow a maintained schedule.

Posting at least once a day is ideal. However, if that isn’t feasible, try to post a few times a week.

If you’re too busy to post every day, try using plugins or software like Semrush, which posts to Facebook automatically for you – it will make your life much easier.

Pay For Ads

Define Your Target Audience

Crucial to the heart of all marketing strategies, not just those on Facebook, defining your target audience allows you to decide who you want to interact with.

Narrow down exactly who you want to market to using Facebook’s tools, such as their Audience Insights, and you can find people who have aligned interests.

Use Beautiful Images

People love pretty things, especially beautiful images. Gorgeous content will encourage your audience to engage with your posts.

Nearly everyone these days has a phone (or some other device) with a camera that has the capability of capturing gorgeous visuals. There’s no excuse – make sure the pictures you post are well-designed, on-brand, and give a viewer pleasing aesthetics.

Use CTAs To Your Advantage

Using a compelling CTA or two is vital to driving not just page views but sales.

A CTA tells your audience where to go next and is what will ultimately drive engagement in the end. After all, you’re trying to turn your audience into consumers.

On the SEJ Facebook page, the CTA is a “Sign Up” button – the link takes you to sign up for the newsletter.

Figure out what the primary goal for your Facebook page is before trying to decide on a CTA. Knowing what you really need will help laser your focus on the right one.

Marketers, Don’t Mess Up On Facebook

Marketing on Facebook can be nerve-wracking, and maybe it should be, just a little bit. If Facebook decides to kick you from the platform, you’re out for good.

Also, if you don’t know some basic marketing skills, you’ll be doomed to stale strategies.

Luckily, it’s not too hard to avoid getting on Facebook’s wrong side if you can follow a few straightforward rules. Knowing what to avoid is the first step – you’ve got that covered.

Now use your knowledge of what to do instead, and don’t just keep yourself from falling. Fly instead!

More Resources:

Featured image: Irina Strelnikova/Shutterstock

Why Do We Need To Learn Powershell?

PowerShell Tutorial

Suppose you know a little bit about Linux, which provides a very rich command interface. Because of Linux rich command, Linux was a preferred platform for software development. On the other hand, windows was mostly used for UI-based uses for non-development purposes. So finally, to control all these issues, Microsoft released PowerShell version 1 for the first time in 2006. The main goal of PowerShell was to provide command rich interface to developers where developers will be able to write scripts and automate various jobs. So initially, they developed PowerShell for Windows only, but after version 6, it started supporting macOS and Linux as well.

Why do we need to learn PowerShell?

In Windows, it has DOS cmd, But if we need to do complex scripting and if we need to write any heavy scripts jobs, then the existing cmd is not good enough. PowerShell allows developers on Windows to write a script with controlling one computer to multiple remote computers at once. DOS is just a shell where PowerShell is a powerful scripting language that is completely based on .NET and is mostly used by my administrator to handle Networks and servers. On Windows, if you use DOS as cmd, you will be only checking ipconfig and some basic things, whereas by learning PowerShell, you will be a complete programmer. Because of its rich commands and object-based approach, it is a powerful tool for scripting.

Below are some points why we should learn PowerShell.

Consistency: The biggest benefit of PowerShell of the current version is that it is available for all Operating systems. So, for example, if you are developing the script on a computer X and after successfully testing your script on your computer X, you can share your script with another person who is going to run your script on his computer Y, which will work perfectly from the version 6 because PowerShell is available for all OS, ie. Windows, Linux, and macOS. So a script will work on different architecture as well. Other than Architecture, PowerShell also provides automation to administration tasks with better performance .

Interactive and scripting environments: The Powershell of Windows Prompt gives us a very interactive tool to access the command-line interface for scripting.

Object orientation: As it is totally written over the .NET, it will give us a complete Object-based approach to implementing it. So we are not just writing a command. It allows us to explore more.

Applications of PowerShell

It will be very useful for administrative management with PowerShell admin to delete, add and update users. We transfer heavy files from one computer to another to multiple network computers at once. If Admin has some task that he will run repetitively, then the Admin can use PowerShell to create a script and put it into job cycles where it will run at given intervals.

Example

Suppose, In PowerShell, we want to see the process with name “nginx” and “node.”

Prerequisites

You can install Powershell by MSI, and you should only need to learn the basics of programming like, if, for loops and variables and it’s an available rich set of commands. Even if you do not know much programming you can directly start with PowerShell.

Target Audience

Developers: A developer can have requirements to develop a tool where he may change his data for a running application regularly. For example, on any e-commerce website, we want to show the best-selling products. So the developer will write a script that will fetch data daily and update top-selling product details so that top-selling products will be visible to end customers.

Administrator: The administrator can write a script for automation of updating, deleting, and performing certain tasks on all the users regularly to avoid repetition of the same tasks.

Why Do We Need Selections In Photoshop?

None of this, however, explains why we need to make selections in the first place, so in this tutorial, we’ll take a quick look at the “why”. This won’t be a detailed explanation of how to make selections. We’ll save that for other tutorials. Here, we’re simply going to look at why we need to make selections at all.

Take selections in Photoshop, for example. There’s no shortage of ways to select things in an image with Photoshop. We can make simple geometric selections with the Rectangular Marquee Tool or the Elliptical Marquee Tool , or freehand selections with the Lasso , Polygonal Lasso or Magnetic Lasso Tools. We can select areas of similar color or brightness values with the Magic Wand or Color Range command. We can paint or refine a selection manually with a brush in Quick Mask mode or by using a layer mask. We can make surgically-precise selections with the Pen Tool , and more! We can even combine different selection methods when none of them by themselves seem to be up to the challenge.

As you may have already discovered on your own if you’ve read through any of our other Photoshop tutorials here at Photoshop Essentials, I’m a big fan of “why”. Lots of people will happily tell us how to do something, but for whatever reason, the why is usually left out, forever limiting our understanding of what it is we’re doing.

Do You See What I See?

As I write this, summer is once again coming to an end. The days are getting shorter, the nights are cooler, and around here, with autumn fast approaching, the weekend farmers markets will soon be filled with bushels and bushels of apples. In fact, here’s some right now just waiting to be picked:

Red, delicious apples. Unless of course, you don’t like apples, but who doesn’t like apples?

Obviously, the main subject in the photo above is the apples, right? But why is it obvious? How do we know that we’re looking at apples? We know because most of us have seen enough apples in the past that we can instantly recognize them. We know their shape, their color and their texture because we’ve seen them before. We could even point to each apple in the photo if someone asked us to without mistakenly pointing at a leaf or something else that isn’t an apple because we have no problem distinguishing between all the different objects in the image. We see things with our eyes and our brain tells us that this is this and that is that, and this is not that and that is not this. In fact, even if we had never seen an apple before, we could at least point to all the objects that look relatively the same. We’re so good at recognizing and identifying objects that we usually do it without consciously thinking about it.

That’s great for us, but what about Photoshop? Does Photoshop see the apples? Does Photoshop recognize their shape, color and texture as “apple”? Can it point to all the apples in the photo without confusing an apple with a leaf, or at least point to all the objects that look the same?

The simple answer is no, it can’t. No matter how many photos of apples you’ve opened in Photoshop in the past (geez, what is it with you and apples?), Photoshop has no idea what apples are or what they look like. The reason is because all Photoshop sees is pixels. It doesn’t matter if it’s a photo of apples, oranges or monkeys eating bananas. To Photoshop, it’s all the same. It’s all just pixels, those tiny little squares that make up a digital photo:

A close-up view of the edge of an apple showing that it’s really just a bunch of tiny square pixels.

Select None To Select Them All

So far, we know that we see things very differently from how Photoshop sees them. We see independent, recognizable objects while Photoshop sees everything as pixels, and we tell Photoshop which pixels we want to work on by selecting them with one or more of the various selection tools. In fact, before we can do anything at all to an image, Photoshop first needs to know which pixels we want to edit.

For example, let’s say I want to change the color of the main apple in the photo. I want to change it from red to green. Based on what I just said, I shouldn’t be able to do that without first selecting the pixels that make up the apple. Let’s give it a try anyway, just for fun. I’ll select the Brush Tool from the Tools panel:

Selecting the Brush Tool.

Photoshop paints with the current Foreground color.

The Color Picker is the most common way to select colors in Photoshop.

Ultra-realistic photo effect. Expert users only.

Wait a minute, what just happened?! I was able to paint over the apple! Photoshop didn’t complain at all! Okay, let’s recap. I said we can’t do anything to an image unless we first select the pixels that we want to edit. Then to prove it, I grabbed my Brush Tool and tried painting over part of the image without first selecting anything, yet I was still able to paint over it. This can only mean one thing… I have no idea what I’m talking about!

Seriously though, the real reason why I was still able to paint over the apple without first selecting any pixels is because of a little known fact. Whenever we have nothing selected in an image, we actually have everything selected. Photoshop assumes that if we didn’t select any specific pixels first, it can only be because we wanted every pixel selected so we can edit the entire photo. Or at least, we have the option to edit the entire photo. As we saw in this example, I was able to paint over just a small area of the image even though I didn’t select any pixels first, but if I wanted to, I could have just as easily painted over the entire image and there would have been nothing preventing me from doing that.

While having the freedom to go where we want and do what we please sounds wonderful, it can actually be a very bad thing, at least when it comes to photo editing. In this example, all I wanted to do was change the color of the apple, yet because I didn’t select the apple first, Photoshop allowed me to paint anywhere I wanted, and all I ended up doing was making a mess of things. Let’s see what happens if I select the apple first.

Painting Inside The Lines

I’m going to undo the paint strokes I added to the image by pressing Ctrl+Z (Win) / Command+Z (Mac), and this time, I’ll select the apple first before painting over it. As I mentioned at the beginning of this tutorial, we’ll save the details of how to actually make selections for other tutorials. For now, I’ll simply go ahead and draw a selection around the apple.

Photoshop displays selection outlines for us as a series of animated dashed lines, or what many people call “marching ants”. Obviously, we can’t see them “marching” in the screenshot, but we can at least see the selection outline that now appears around the apple:

Selection outlines appear as animated “marching ants”.

Of course, to us, it looks like I’ve selected the apple, but keep in mind that as far as Photoshop is concerned, all I’ve done is selected some of the pixels in the image. They just happen to be the pixels that make up what you and I see as an apple. The pixels that fall within the boundaries of the selection outline are now selected, which means that they can be affected by whatever edits I make next, while the remaining pixels outside of the selection outline are not selected and won’t be affected by anything I do.

Let’s see what happens now when I try painting over the apple again. I’ll grab the Brush Tool just like I did before, and with green still as my Foreground color, I’ll try painting over the apple. The only difference this time is that I selected the apple first:

The paint strokes now appear only inside the selected area.

Thanks to the selection I made before painting, Photoshop allowed me to paint only inside my selected area. Even though I moved the brush well outside the boundaries of the selection as I was painting and made no attempt to stay inside the lines, none of the pixels outside of the selection outline were affected. They remained safe and unharmed no matter how sloppy I was with the brush, and I was able to easily paint over the apple without worrying about the rest of the image, all thanks to my selection!

Of course, just because we’ve selected a certain area of pixels doesn’t mean we necessarily have to edit every pixel inside the selection outline. I’m going to once again remove my green paint strokes by pressing Ctrl+Z (Win) / Command+Z (Mac) to undo the last step, and this time, with my selection still active, I’m going to use a much larger brush with soft edges to paint only along the bottom half of the apple, giving me a nice transition in the middle between the green brush color and the natural red of the apple. Even though the pixels in the top half of the apple are part of the selection I made, they remain unchanged because I chose not to paint over them. Photoshop doesn’t actually care if we do anything with the pixels we’ve selected. All it cares about is that we don’t get to touch the pixels we didn’t select:

Any pixel inside of a selection outline can be edited, but nothing says you have to edit every pixel.

Just as before, my paint stroke is confined to the pixels inside of the selection outline, even though I moved well outside of it with my brush. To make things look a bit more realistic, I’m going to blend the green color in with the apple using one of Photoshop’s blend modes. I’ll go up to the Edit menu at the top of the screen and choose the Fade Brush Tool option:

The actual name of the Fade option changes depending on the last edit that was made.

This brings up Photoshop’s Fade dialog box, which allows us to make some adjustments to the previous edit. To blend the green in with the apple, I’m going to change the blend mode of the brush to Color, and to lower the intensity of the green, I’ll lower the Opacity option down to around 80%:

The Color blend mode allows us to change the color of an object without changing its original brightness values.

Press Ctrl+H (Win) / Command+H (Mac) to temporarily hide selection outlines. Press it again to bring them back.

Up next, we’ll look at another important reason for making selections – working with layers!

Selections Make Layers More Useful

Up until now, I’ve been making all of my edits directly on the Background layer, which is a very bad way to work because it means that I’ve been making changes to my original photo. If I was to save my changes and close out of the document window, the original image would be lost forever. Sometimes that may be fine, but it tends to leave a bad impression when you’re forced to call up a client and ask, “Would you happen to have another copy of the photo you sent over? I sort of… well, hehe… I kind of ruined the copy you gave me”.

A much better way to work in Photoshop is to use layers. With layers, we can work on a copy of the image while leaving the original unharmed, and thanks to selections, we can even copy different parts of an image to their own layers so we can work on them independently! Without the ability to make selections though, layers in Photoshop would be nowhere near as useful as they are.

I’m going to revert my image back to its original, unedited state by going up to the File menu and choosing Revert. This sets my image back to the way it was when I first opened it:

The Revert command reverts an image back to its original state or to the last saved state.

A very common Photoshop effect is to leave something in the image in full color while converting the rest of the photo to black and white. Let’s see how selections can help us to do this. First, since we just said that working directly on the Background layer is a bad thing, let’s duplicate the Background layer, which will give us a copy of it that we can work on. To do that, I’ll go up to the Layer menu at the top of the screen, then I’ll choose New, and then I’ll choose Layer via Copy:

Creating a copy of the original image.

If we look in the Layers panel, we can see that we now have two layers – the Background layer on the bottom which holds the original photo, and a new layer above it which Photoshop has named “Layer 1”, containing a copy of the photo that we can safely edit without harming the original:

Working on a copy of the image keeps the original safe.

Notice that the entire Background layer was copied. We’ll come back to this in a moment. Since we want to leave the apple with its original colors while converting everything else to black and white, we’ll need to select the apple before we do anything else, so I’ll once again draw a selection around it. Our familiar selection outline reappears:

A selection outline appears once again around the apple.

With the apple selected, I’m going to create another copy of the image by going back up to the Layer menu, choosing New and then choosing Layer via Copy. Remember that the last time we did this, Photoshop copied the entire layer. This time though, something different has happened. We now have a third layer in the Layers panel sitting above “Layer 1” and the Background layer, but if we look in the preview thumbnail to the left of the new layer’s name, we can see that all we copied this time was the apple itself, not the entire layer:

True to its name, the preview thumbnail gives us a preview of the contents of each layer.

Any time we have a selection active when we copy a layer, only the area inside the selection outline is copied, which is why in this case, only the apple was copied. This ability to isolate a specific object in a photo and place it on its own layer is what makes layers so incredibly useful. If we couldn’t select anything first, all we could do is make copy after copy of the entire image, which is usually about as pointless as it sounds.

Selected layers appear highlighted in blue.

To convert the image to black and white, I’ll quickly desaturate it by going up to the Image menu, choosing Adjustments and then choosing Desaturate:

The Desaturate command is a quick way to remove color from an image.

Desaturating an image is certainly not the best way to convert a color photo to black and white, but it works in a hurry. Let’s look again in the Layers panel, where we can see in the preview thumbnail for “Layer 1” that the copy of our original image now appears in black and white, while the apple on the layer above it has been unaffected and remains in color:

Only “Layer 1” has been desaturated.

Since the apple is sitting on a layer above the black and white version of the image, it appears in full color in front of the black and white image in the document window:

Combining selections with layers makes a great creative team.

Of course, there’s a lot more we can do with selections in Photoshop than just painting inside of them or copying them to new layers, but hopefully this gave us an idea of why selections are so important. Photoshop sees only pixels where we see independent objects, so we need selections as a way to bridge the gap between our world and Photoshop’s world. And while layers can stake their claim as one of the biggest and best features of Photoshop, they owe more of their usefulness to selections than they’d probably care to admit.

What Is Onedrive And Why Do I Need It?

You must have noticed by now, the faster and more popular SSDs come in much smaller capacities than the older hard disks. Moreover, people prefer these smaller sized SSDs than buying slower HDDs. Two things come to mind as to why this may be happening.

First, the speed benefits of SSDs outperform the storage capacities, leading to many users going for a hybrid setup with both storage types. Secondly, people do not need to store their frequently accessed files locally, as cloud storage gains popularity.

Here, I shall be discussing what is OneDrive and why do you need it on your computer.

Similar to your local storage, you can store all kinds of files and folders in OneDrive. The added benefit to this is that you can access these files from all the devices that you own, using your login credentials. Works wonder if you need to work on a file on the go, you can start the work on one of your devices and later pick right where you left on another.

Being a Microsoft product, Windows 10 users get additional benefits as well. These include seamless integration with your Office product to allow sharing and collaborating with other users, syncing your Windows settings across all your devices.

One of the benefits of using cloud storage is that cloud storage acts as your backup system. Thus, if your hardware device gets damaged due to some reason, you can safely recover your files from OneDrive. Extend this to storing your BitLocker or other file encryption recovery keys, and you will virtually never lose data (unless your subscription expires, or your Microsoft account is hacked).

If you want to use OneDrive on your devices, you will first need a Microsoft account. If you do not already have one, you can create an account on the OneDrive website as well.

When you sign up for Microsoft OneDrive, you get 5 GB of online storage for free. This should be enough if you have plenty of onboard storage and only want to keep some important files on the go. To create an account, follow these steps:

Open the OneDrive web page from your web browser of choice.

Sign up for free

Create a Microsoft Account, by entering your credentials and following the on-screen instructions.

Once you have signed up, you will be automatically redirected to the OneDrive website, where you will be able to see the files currently on your online storage.

Note: If you already have a Microsoft account, you need to sign in to your account, which is already connected to an OneDrive account as well.

Once you have your account set up, you can now set up the OneDrive folder on your computer as well. This folder can be used to access the files on your online storage account, and quickly add or remove files as well. New Windows 10 installations usually come with the OneDrive application already installed, so follow these steps to set up the folder:

Simply open Windows Search by pressing the Windows key on your keyboard.

You can also access this file from the left pane context menu in File Explorer.

Note: If you do not have OneDrive installed, you can download the app from the Microsoft Store or by using this direct download link.

The answer to this depends on your usage, and how ready you want to be with your files. If you find yourself constantly working on the go, or between multiple devices, you may benefit a lot from online storage. You can have all your important files virtually with you wherever you go.

When you sign up for Office 365, you get 1 TB storage, which you can utilize if you only have limited storage (128 GB or 256 GB SSDs as local storage) on your computer.

However, if you have plenty of onboard storage and do not want to utilize cloud storage, you can uninstall OneDrive from your computer. Follow these steps for the same:

This will open the Apps section of the Settings app.

Follow the onscreen instructions and restart the computer once done, and you will have removed OneDrive from your computer.

So, there you have it. Now you know what OneDrive is and why you need it, and how does OneDrive work on your Windows 10 computer. Comment below if you found this useful, and to discuss further the same.

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